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Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia

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Title: Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia  
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Subject: Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Thailand, Accession of East Timor to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, ASEAN Hymn, ASEAN–Australia Development Cooperation Program
Collection: 1976 in Indonesia, Association of Southeast Asian Nations Treaties, History of Southeast Asia, Peace Treaties, Treaties Concluded in 1976, Treaties Entered Into by the European Union, Treaties Entered Into Force in 1976, Treaties of Australia, Treaties of Bangladesh, Treaties of Brunei, Treaties of Cambodia, Treaties of East Timor, Treaties of France, Treaties of India, Treaties of Indonesia, Treaties of Japan, Treaties of Laos, Treaties of Malaysia, Treaties of Mongolia, Treaties of Myanmar, Treaties of New Zealand, Treaties of North Korea, Treaties of Pakistan, Treaties of Papua New Guinea, Treaties of Russia, Treaties of Singapore, Treaties of South Korea, Treaties of Sri Lanka, Treaties of Thailand, Treaties of the People's Republic of China, Treaties of the Philippines, Treaties of the United States, Treaties of Vietnam
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Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia

The Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia is a Southeast Asia.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Principles 2
  • Parties 3
  • References 4

History

On February 24, 1976, the treaty was signed into force by the leaders of the original members of ASEAN,[1] Lee Kuan Yew, Ferdinand Marcos, Datuk Hussein Onn, Kukrit Pramoj, and Suharto.[2] Other members acceded to it upon or before joining the bloc. It was amended on December 15, 1987 by a protocol to open the document for accession by states outside Southeast Asia,[3] and again on July 25, 1998, to condition such accession on the consent of all member states.[4] On July 23, 2001, the parties established the rules of procedure of the treaty's High Council, which was stipulated in Article 14 of the document.[5] On October 7, 2003, during the annual summit, a declaration was released that says:[6]

"A High Council of [the treaty] shall be the important component in the ASEAN Security Community since it reflects ASEAN’s commitment to resolve all differences, disputes and conflicts peacefully."

India and China were first, outside ASEAN to sign the treaty in 2003 at Bali, Indonesia. As of July 2009, sixteen countries outside the bloc have acceded to the treaty. On July 22, 2009, [11]

"The purposes and principles of the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia and its provisions for the pacific settlement of regional disputes and for regional cooperation in order to achieve peace, amity and friendship among the peoples of Southeast Asia [are] in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations."

Principles

The purpose of the Treaty is to promote perpetual peace, everlasting amity and cooperation among the people of Southeast Asia which would contribute to their strength, solidarity, and closer relationship. In their relations with one another, the High Contracting Parties shall be guided by the following fundamental principles;[2]

a. mutual respect for the independence, sovereignty, equality, territorial integrity and national identity of all nations,
b. the right of every State to lead its national existence free from external interference, subversion or coercion,
c. non-interference in the internal affairs of one another,
d. settlement of differences or disputes by peaceful means,
e. renunciation of the threat or use of force, and
f. effective cooperation among themselves.

Parties

Countries that entered into the treaty by date

The following table lists the parties in the order of the dates on which they entered into the treaty:

Country Date
Indonesia February 24, 1976
Malaysia February 24, 1976
Philippines February 24, 1976
Singapore February 24, 1976
Thailand February 24, 1976
Brunei January 7, 1984[12]
Papua New Guinea July 5, 1989[11]
Laos June 29, 1992[13]
Vietnam July 22, 1992[14]
Cambodia January 23, 1995[15]
Burma (Myanmar) July 27, 1995[16]
People's Republic of China October 8, 2003[17]
India October 8, 2003[18]
Japan July 2, 2004[19]
Pakistan July 2, 2004[20]
South Korea November 27, 2004[21]
Russia November 29, 2004[22]
New Zealand July 25, 2005[23]
Mongolia July 28, 2005[24]
Australia December 10, 2005[25]
France July 20, 2006[26]
East Timor January 13, 2007[27]
Bangladesh August 1, 2007[28]
Sri Lanka August 1, 2007[29]
North Korea July 24, 2008[30]
United States July 23, 2009[31]
European Union June 12, 2012[32]

References

  1. ^ "Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2013-05-28. 
  2. ^ a b Forty-seventh session of the Geeral Assembly A/C.1/47/L.24 30 October 1992 [1]
  3. ^ "Protocol Amending the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. ,
  4. ^ "Second Protocol Amending the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  5. ^ "Rules of Procedure of the High Council of the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  6. ^ "Declaration of ASEAN Concord II (Bali Concord II)". Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  7. ^ "Beginning a New Era of Diplomacy in Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  8. ^ "Joint Declaration of the ASEAN-EU Commemorative Summit". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  9. ^ "Explanatory Memorandum for the Treaty of Amity and Co-operation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  10. ^ "Thailand and EU’s Issues Consulted". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  11. ^ a b "Review and implementation of the Concluding Document of the Twelfth Special Session of the General Assembly". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  12. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  13. ^ "Declaration on the Admission of the Lao People's Democratic Republic into the Association of Southeast Asian Nations". Retrieved 2009-02-23.  However, a United Nations document states that Laos acceded to the treaty on the same day as Vietnam, July 22, 1992. The reason for the discrepancy is not apparent.
  14. ^ "Declaration of the Admission of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam into the Association of Southeast Asian Nations". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  15. ^ "Declaration on the Admission of the Kingdom of Cambodia into the Association of Southeast Asian Nations". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  16. ^ "Declaration on the Admission of the Union of Myanmar into the Association of Southeast Asian Nations". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  17. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  18. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  19. ^ "Japan Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southest Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  20. ^ "The Islamic Republic of Pakistan Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  21. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia by Republic of Korea". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  22. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia by Russian Federation". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  23. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia by New Zealand". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  24. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia by Mongolia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  25. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia by Australia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  26. ^ "Declaration on the Deposit of the Instrument of Accession of the French Republic to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23.  The instrument of accession was deposited half a year after it was signed.
  27. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  28. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  29. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia by Sri Lanka". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  30. ^ "Instrument of Accession to the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast". Retrieved 2009-02-23. 
  31. ^ "U.S. Accession to ASEAN's Treaty of Amity and Cooperation (TAC)". Retrieved 2009-07-21. 
  32. ^ EU in Asia http://eeas.europa.eu/asia/docs/2012_eu_in_asia_year_facts_figures_en.pdf=The EU in Asia. Retrieved 2013-010-16. 
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