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Lois Gibbs

Lois Marie Gibbs (born 1951) is an American environmental activist.

Lois Gibbs speaks to environmental groups who oppose sulfide mining near Lake Superior north of Marquette, MI

Gibbs's involvement in environmental causes began in 1978 when she discovered that her 7-year-old son's elementary school in

  • Center for Health, Environment & Justice website

External links

  1. ^ Verhovek, Sam How (August 5, 1988). "After 10 Years, the Trauma of Love Canal Continues". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-07-29. 
  2. ^ CHEJ About Lois Page
  3. ^ CHEJ Our Mission Page
  4. ^ a b c CHEJ Staff Page
  5. ^ Worldcat results (books by and about her)
  6. ^ IMDB entry
  7. ^ The Heinz Awards, Lois Gibbs profile

References

Gallery

Awards and honors

Contents

  • Awards and honors 1
  • Gallery 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Gibbs has authored several books about the Love Canal story and the effects of toxic waste.[5] Her story was dramatized in the 1982 made-for-TV movie Lois Gibbs: the Love Canal Story, in which she was played by Marsha Mason.[6]

[4] In 1980, Gibbs formed the Citizens' Clearinghouse for Hazardous Waste, later renamed the

[3], which is used to locate and clean up toxic waste sites throughout the United States.Superfund's Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency She led her community in a battle against the local, state, and federal governments. After years of struggle, 833 families were eventually evacuated, and cleanup of Love Canal began. National press coverage made Lois Gibbs a household name. Her efforts also led to the creation of the [2]

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