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List of Westinghouse locomotives

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List of Westinghouse locomotives

Locomotives built or sold by the Westinghouse Electric Company

Westinghouse began their rail car business in 1905 and ended after 1954.

Electric locomotives

Usually built in partnership with the Baldwin Locomotive Works, see Baldwin-Westinghouse electric locomotives.

Model Built year Total
produced
AAR wheel arrangement Supply voltage Power output Image
PRR AA1 1905 2 B-B 600 V DC
NH EP1[1][2][3] 1905–1908 42 1-B-B-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC
600 V DC
636 V AC
1,260 hp (0.94 MW)
CN Z-2[4] 1907–1908 6 C 3300 V, 25 Hz AC 675 hp (0.50 MW)
NH 071[3] 1910 1 1-B+B-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC
600V DC
Continuous: 1,432 hp (1.07 MW)
NH 070[3] 1910 1 1-B+B-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC
600V DC
Continuous: 1,100 hp (0.82 MW)
Boston and Maine Railroad
Hoosac Tunnel locomotives[5]
1910 5 1-B+B-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC Continuous: 1,224 hp (0.91 MW)
NH 072[3] 1911 1 1-B+B-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC
600V DC
Continuous: 1,240 hp (0.92 MW)
NH 069[3] 1911 1 1-A-B-A-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC
600V DC
Continuous: 1,336 hp (1.00 MW)
NH EY2[6] 1911–1927 22 B+B 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 652 hp (0.49 MW)
NH EF1[3][7] 1912–1913 39 1-B+B-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC
(1st 3 units also equipped for 600V DC)
1,600 hp (1.19 MW)
N&W LC-1[8] 1914–1915 12 (1-B+B-1)+(1-B+B-1) 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 3,211 hp (2.39 MW)
NH EP2[9] 1918–1927 27 1-C-1+1-C-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC
600 V DC
3,120 hp (2.33 MW)
MILW EP-3 1919 10 2-C-1+1-C-2 3,000 V DC Cont: 3,400 hp (2.54 MW),
1 hour: 4,680 hp (3.49 MW)
CPEF 1B+B1 (Brazil) 1921–1925 3 1B+B1 3,000 V DC 1,800 hp (1.34 MW)
CPEF C+C (Brazil) 1921–1928 10 C+C 3,000 V DC 1,350 hp (1.01 MW)
N&W LC-2[1][10] 1924 4 (1-D-1)+(1-D-1) 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 4,750 hp (3.54 MW) (ALCO carbody)
DT&I 500-501[11][12] 1925 2 D+D 22 kV, 25 Hz AC 2,500 hp (1.86 MW) Motor-Generator
(Ford carbody)
VGN EL-3A[13] 1925-6 36 1-D-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 2,000 hp (1.49 MW)
GN Z-1[13][14][15] 1926-8 10 1-D-1 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 1,830 hp (1.36 MW)
PRR P5 1931–1935 54 2-C-2 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 3,750 hp (2.80 MW)
PRR R1 1934 1 2-D-2 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 5,000 hp (3.73 MW)
NH EF3b 1942 5 2-C+C-2 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 4,860 hp (3.62 MW)
PRR E3b 1951 2 B-B-B 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 3,000 hp (2.24 MW)
PRR E2c 1952 2 C-C 11 kV, 25 Hz AC 3,000 hp (2.24 MW)

Diesel-electric locomotives

Early examples built in partnership with William Beardmore and Company (Beardmore) of Glasgow, Scotland.
Model Built year Total
produced
AAR wheel arrangement Prime mover Power output Image
“Ike & Mike”[16] 1928 2 B Beardmore 6 cyl 8¼ × 12 330 hp (250 kW)
Boxcab[17] 1928–1929 3 B-B Westinghouse 8¼ × 12 300 hp (220 kW)
CN 9000[18] 1929 2 2-D-1 Beardmore 12 cyl 12×12 1,330 hp (990 kW)
“Visibility Cab” switcher[19] 1929–1931 4 B-B 6 cyl 9 × 12 400 horsepower (300 kW)
1929–1931 4 6 cyl Westinghouse 8¼ × 12 300 horsepower (220 kW)
1937 3 6 cyl 9 × 12 supercharged 530 horsepower (400 kW)
“Visibility Cab” switcher[20] 1930–1935 4 B-B 6 cyl 9 × 12 (×2) 800 horsepower (600 kW)
Center cab switcher (V12)[21] 1934 1 B-B V12 9 × 12 800 horsepower (600 kW)
Center cab roadswitcher (V12)[21] 1935 1 B-B V12 9 × 12 (×2) 1,600 horsepower (1,190 kW)
Center cab switcher[22] 1933–1935 4 B-B 4 cyl 265 hp (×2) 530 horsepower (400 kW)
Illinois Steel Company 50[22] 1931 1 B-B Westinghouse 8¼ × 12 300 hp (220 kW)

Gas Turbine-electric locomotives

Model Built year Total
produced
AAR wheel arrangement Prime mover Power output Image
Blue Goose[23] 1950 1 B-B-B-B Gas Turbine (×2) 4,000 hp (2.98 MW)

References

  1. ^ a b Train Shed Cyclopedia (Newton K. Gregg) (66). 1978.  
  2. ^ Electric Locomotive Plan and Photo Book, NH EP-1 chapter
  3. ^ a b c d e f Swanberg, J.W. (1988)
  4. ^ Edson & Corley (1982) p.143
  5. ^ Electric Locomotive Plan and Photo Book, B&M chapter
  6. ^ Electric Locomotive Plan and Photo Book, NH EY-2 chapter
  7. ^ Electric Locomotive Plan and Photo Book, NH EF-1 chapter
  8. ^ Electric Locomotive Plan and Photo Book, N&W chapter
  9. ^ Electric Locomotive Plan and Photo Book, NH EP-2 chapter
  10. ^ "NWHS Arrow". The Norfolk and Western Historical Society. July–August 1994. Retrieved 2009-04-07. 
  11. ^ "TODAY in Ford History--Nov. 29". Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  12. ^ "DT&I - The Railroad That Went No Place". Retrieved 2009-04-16. 
  13. ^ a b Train Shed Cyclopedia (Newton K. Gregg) (15). 1974.  
  14. ^ Keyes & Middleton (1980) p.117
  15. ^ "Great Northern Empire, Then and Now". Ben Ringnalda. 2005. Retrieved 2009-04-07. 
  16. ^ Pinkepank (1973) p.407
  17. ^ Pinkepank (1973) p.408
  18. ^ Pinkepank (1973) p.409
  19. ^ Pinkepank (1973) p.410
  20. ^ Pinkepank (1973) p.411
  21. ^ a b Pinkepank (1973) p.412
  22. ^ a b Pinkepank (1973) p.413
  23. ^ Pinkepank (1973) p.414
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