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Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology

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Title: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Menenia (gens), Apustia (gens), Veturia (gens), Hostilia (gens), Aulia (gens)
Collection: 1849 Books, Biographical Dictionaries by Topic, Internet Encyclopedias, Reference Works in the Public Domain, References on Greek Mythology
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology

The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology (1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. Edited by William Smith, the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography. The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.

Contents

  • Authors and scope 1
  • Use and availability today 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Authors and scope

The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles. The authors were classical scholars, primarily from Oxford, Cambridge, the Rugby School, and the University of Bonn, but some were from other institutions. Many of the mythological entries were the work of the German expatriate Leonhard Schmitz, who helped to popularise German classical scholarship in Britain.[1]

With respect to biographies, Smith intended to be comprehensive. In the preface, he writes:

"The biographical articles in this work include the names of all persons of any importance which occur in the Greek and Roman writers, from the earliest times down to the extinction of the Western Empire in the year 476 of our era, and to the extinction of the Eastern Empire by the capture of Constantinople by the turks in the year 1453."

Many of the Dictionary's definitions and articles have been referred to in more recent works, and Robert Graves has been accused of "lifting his impressive-looking source references straight, and unchecked" from it when writing The Greek Myths.[1]

Use and availability today

The work is now in the public domain, and is available in several places on the Internet. While still largely accurate (only rarely have ancient texts been emended so severely as to warrant a biographical change), much is missing, especially more recent discoveries (like Aristotle's Constitution of the Athenians, or the decipherment of Linear B) and epigraphic material. Perhaps more seriously, the context in which ancient evidence is viewed has often changed in the intervening century and a half.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b  

External links

  • Vol. IDictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. online at University of Michigan Library. (Entries: Abaeus – Dysponteus)
  • Vol. IIDictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. online at University of Michigan Library. (Entries: Ea'rinus, Fla'vius – Nyx)
  • Vol. IIIDictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. online at University of Michigan Library. (Entries: Oarses – Zygia and Zygius)

Also the Internet Archive archive has a derivative work:

  • Smith, William (1853). A new classical dictionary of biography, mythology, and geography, partly based on the "Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology.". London: Murray. 
  • Anthon, Charles; Smith, William (1860). A new classical dictionary of Greek and Roman biography, mythology and geography: partly based upon the Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology by William Smith (1860). New York: Harper and Brothers. 
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