World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Stud (animal)

Article Id: WHEBN0004028479
Reproduction Date:

Title: Stud (animal)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Congested Districts Board (Scotland), Cedric (horse), The Blood-Horse, Frozen bovine semen, Ten Most Wanted (horse)
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Stud (animal)

Stud Murray Grey cows receiving supplementary feeding during a drought, Graman, NSW.

A stud animal is a registered animal retained for breeding. The terms for the male of a given animal species (stallion, bull, rooster, etc.) usually imply that the animal is entire—that is, not castrated—and therefore capable of siring offspring. A specialized vocabulary exists for de-sexed animals and those animals used in grading up to a purebred status.[1]

Stud females are generally used to breed further stud animals, but stud males may be used in crossbreeding programs.[2] Both sexes of stud animals are regularly used in artificial breeding programs.

A stud farm, in animal husbandry, is an establishment for selective breeding using stud animals.[3] This results in artificial selection.

Stud fees

A stud fee is a price paid by the owner of a female animal, such as a horse or a dog, to the owner of a male animal for the right to breed to it. Service fees can range from a small amount for a local male animal of unknown breeding to several hundred thousand dollars for the right to breed to a champion Thoroughbred race horse such as Storm Cat or Storm Dog who has stood at stud fees of up to US$500,000.

Many owners of high-quality stallions also offer a live foal guarantee with a breeding, usually defined as a guarantee that once the mare leaves the stud farm confirmed to be in foal by a veterinarian, she will give birth to a foal that stands and nurses, or else the stud farm will re-breed the mare for no stud fee the following season.

Most stud fees do not include the costs of boarding the female animal at the location of the stud animal, or of the cost of collecting and shipping semen if artificial insemination is used in lieu of live cover. Any veterinary expenses or medications are also an additional cost to the owner of the female animal.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Santa Gertrudis Standard of Classification". Retrieved 8 November 2014. 
  2. ^ Stud ewes Retrieved on 15 October 2008
  3. ^ Taylor, Peter, Pastoral Properties of Australia, George Allen & Unwin, Sydney, London, Boston,1984
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.