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Pope Marinus II

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Pope Marinus II

Pope
Marinus II
Papacy began 30 October 942
Papacy ended May 946
Predecessor Stephen VIII
Successor Agapetus II
Personal details
Birth name Marinus
Born ???
Rome, Papal States
Died May 946
Rome, Papal States
Other popes named Marinus

Pope Marinus II (or Martin III; died May 946), was Pope from 30 October 942 to his death in 946.

Pontificate

Marinus was born in Rome, and prior to becoming pope he was attached to the Church of Saint Cyriacus in the Baths of Diocletian. He was said to have encountered St. Ulrich on his visit to Rome in 909, and reportedly predicted Ulrich’s eventual appointment as Bishop of Augsburg after the devastation of the Hungarian invasion.[1]

Marinus was elevated to the papacy on 30 October 942 through intervention of Alberic II of Spoleto, Prince of the Romans, and concentrated on administrative aspects of the papacy,[2] and sought to reform both the secular and regular clergy. He extended the appointment of Frederick, Archbishop of Mainz as Papal Vicar and Missus dominicus throughout Germany and Francia.[3] Marinus later intervened when the Bishop of Capua seized without authorization a church which had been given to the local Benedictine monks.[4] In fact, throughout his pontificate, Marinus favoured various monasteries, issuing a number of Papal bulls in their favour.[5]

Marinus occupied the palace built by Pope John VII atop the Palatine Hill in the ruins of the Domus Gaiana.[6] He died in May 946 and was succeeded by Agapetus II.[7]

Marinus/Martinus error

Because of the similarity of the names Marinus and Martinus, Popes Marinus I and Marinus II were, in some sources, mistakenly given the name Martinus (and were then listed respectively as Martinus II and Martinus III). Thus, when the new Pope in 1281 took the name Martin, he became Pope Martin IV.

Notes

  1. ^ Mann, pgs. 218-219
  2. ^ Imma Penn, Dogma Evolution and Papal Fallacies, (AuthorHouse, 2007), 207.
  3. ^ Mann, pg. 219
  4. ^ DeCormenin, Louis Marie; Gihon, James L., A Complete History of the Popes of Rome, from Saint Peter, the First Bishop to Pius the Ninth (1857), pgs. 290-291
  5. ^ Mann, pg. 221
  6. ^ Mann, pg. 222
  7. ^ Mann, pg. 223

References

  • Mann, Horace K., The Lives of the Popes in the Early Middle Ages, Vol. IV: The Popes in the Days of Feudal Anarchy, 891-999 (1910)

External links

  • Opera Omnia by Migne Patrologia Latina with analytical indexes
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Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Stephen VIII
Pope
942–946
Succeeded by
Agapetus II
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