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Ninsun

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Title: Ninsun  
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Subject: Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh, Anunnaki, Nidaba, Utu
Collection: Epic of Gilgamesh, Fictional Iraqi People, Mesopotamian Goddesses
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Ninsun

Ninsun
Abode Uruk
Symbol Cow
Consort Lugalbanda
Parents Anu and Uras
Children Gilgamesh

In Sumerian mythology, Ninsun or Ninsuna ("lady wild cow") is a goddess, best known as the mother of the legendary hero Gilgamesh, and as the tutelary goddess of Gudea of Lagash. Her parents are the deities Anu and Uras.

Contents

  • Myths 1
  • Names 2
  • Notes 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Myths

In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Ninsun is depicted as a human queen who lives in Uruk with her son as king. Since the father of Gilgamesh was former king Lugalbanda, it stands to reason that Ninsun procreated with Lugalbanda to give birth.

Also in the Epic of Gilgamesh, Ninsun is summoned by Gilgamesh and Enkidu to help pray to the god Utu to help the two on their journey to the Country of the Living to battle Humbaba.

Names

Ninsun is called "Rimat-Ninsun", the "August cow", the "Wild Cow of the Enclosure", and "The Great Queen". In the Tello relief (the ancient Lagash, 2150 BC) her name is written with the cuneiform glyphs as: DINGIR.NIN.GUL where the glyph for GUL is the same for SUN2. The meaning of SUN2 is attested as "cow".

Notes

Ninsun was called Gula in Sumerian Mythology until the name was later changed to Ninisina. Gula in the latter became a Babylonian goddess.

Ninsun was originally named Nininsina, according to Pabilsag's journey to Nibru. According to the ancient Babylonian text, Nininsina wedded Pabilsag near a riverbank. By Pabilsag she bore Damu.

See also

References

  • Encyclopedia of Gods, Kyle Cathie Limited, 2002
  • John A. Halloran, Sumerian Lexicon, 2003

External links

  • Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses: Ninsumun (Ninsun) (goddess)
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