World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Muslim holidays

Article Id: WHEBN0002035419
Reproduction Date:

Title: Muslim holidays  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Eid al-Adha, Islam, Day of Arafah, Isra and Mi'raj, Festival of Imam Taiyyab
Collection: Islamic Holy Days
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Muslim holidays

There are two official holidays in Islam: Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha. Eid Al-Fitr is celebrated at the end of Ramadan (a month of fasting), and Muslims usually give zakat (charity) on the occasion. Eid Al-Adha is celebrated on the tenth day of Dhu al-Hijjah and lasts for four days, during which Muslims usually sacrifice an animal and distribute its meat among family, friends, and the poor.

Both holidays occur on dates in the Islamic (Hijri) calendar, which is lunar, and thus their dates in the Gregorian calendar, which is solar, change each year. The Gregorian calendar is based on the orbital period of the Earth's revolution around the Sun, approximately 36514 days, while the Islamic calendar is based on the synodic period of the Moon's revolution around the Earth, approximately 2912 days. The Islamic calendar alternates months of 29 and 30 days (which begin with the new moon). Twelve of these months constitute an Islamic year, which is 11 days shorter than the Gregorian year.

Contents

  • Eid holidays 1
  • Religious practice 2
    • Fasting 2.1
    • Pilgrimage 2.2
      • Hajj 2.2.1
      • Umrah 2.2.2
  • Dates of holidays and other days of note 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5
  • External links 6

Eid holidays

Religious practice

Fasting

Ramadan is the month in which Muslims must fast from dawn to sunset, this is meant to feel like the poor people, when they go without food or water. Therefore Muslims fast by denying themselves both food and drink. This, they believe to allow the nourishment of the soul. In addition, there are culture-specific beliefs regarding the watching of television, listening to music, and the practicing of any secular habit that does not in some way enhance spirituality.

Pilgrimage

Hajj

Umrah

Dates of holidays and other days of note

Hijri date 1435 AH[1][2] 1436 AH[3][4] 1437 AH[5][6] 1438 AH[7][8] 1439 AH[9][10]
Islamic New Year 1 Muḥarram 4 Nov. 2013 25 Oct. 2014 14 Oct. 2015 2 Oct. 2016 21 Sep. 2017
Day of Ashura 10 Muḥarram 13 Nov. 2013 3 Nov. 2014 23 Oct. 2015 11 Oct. 2016 30 Sep. 2017
Arba'een[1] 20 Ṣafar 23 Dec. 2013 12 Dec. 2014 2 Dec. 2015 20 Nov. 2016 9 Nov. 2017
Mawlid an-Nabī[2] 12 Rabī‘ al-Awwal (Sunnis) 13 Jan. 2014 3 Jan. 2015 23 Dec. 2015 11 Dec. 2016 30 Nov. 2017
17 Rabī‘ al-Awwal (Shias) 18 Jan. 2014 8 Jan. 2015 28 Dec. 2015 16 Dec. 2016 5 Dec. 2017
Birthday of ‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib[1] 13 Rajab 12 May 2014 2 May 2015 20 Apr. 2016 10 Apr. 2017 30 Mar. 2018
Laylat al-Mi'raj 27 Rajab[3] 26 May 2014 16 May 2015 4 May 2016 24 Apr. 2017 13 Apr. 2018
Laylat al-Bara'at 15 Sha‘bān 13 June 2014 2 June 2015 22 May 2016 11 May 2017 1 May 2018
Birthday of Muhammad al-Mahdī[4] 15 Sha‘bān 13 June 2014 2 June 2015 22 May 2016 11 May 2017 1 May 2018
First day of Ramaḍān 1 Ramaḍān 29 June 2014 18 June 2015 6 June 2016 27 May 2017 16 May 2018
Laylat al-Qadr 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, or 29 Ramaḍān[5] between
17 & 26 July 2014
between
7 & 16 July 2015
between
25 June & 4 July 2016
between
15 & 24 June 2017
between
4 & 13 June 2018
Chaand Raat[6] 29 or 30 Ramaḍān[7] 27 July 2014 16 July 2015 5 July 2016 24 June 2017 14 June 2018
Eid al-Fitr 1 Shawwāl 28 July 2014 17 July 2015 6 July 2016 25 June 2017 15 June 2018
Hajj 8–13 Dhū al-Ḥijja 2–7 Oct. 2014 21–26 Sep. 2015 9–14 Sep. 2016 30 Aug. – 4 Sep. 2017 19–24 Aug. 2018
Day of Arafah 9 Dhū al-Ḥijja 3 Oct. 2014 22 Sep. 2015 10 Sep. 2016 31 Aug. 2017 20 Aug. 2018
Eid al-Adha 10 Dhū al-Ḥijja 4 Oct. 2014 23 Sep. 2015 11 Sep. 2016 1 Sep. 2017 21 Aug. 2018
Eid al-Ghadeer[1] 18 Dhū al-Ḥijja 12 Oct. 2014 1 Oct. 2015 19 Sep. 2016 9 Sep. 2017 29 Aug. 2018
  1. ^ a b c Primarily observed by Shias.
  2. ^ Not observed by some Sunnis.
  3. ^ There is some disagreement about this date; see Isra and Mi'raj.
  4. ^ Primarily observed by Twelver Shias.
  5. ^ Most often observed on 27 Ramaḍān; see Laylat al-Qadr.
  6. ^ Primarily observed in South Asia.
  7. ^ Observed on the last evening of Ramaḍān; see Chaand Raat.

Some Gregorian dates may vary slightly from those given, and may also vary by country. See Islamic calendar.

References

  1. ^ "2014 Special Islamic Days". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  2. ^ "Gregorian/Hijri Calendar for 1435". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  3. ^ "2015 Special Islamic Days". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  4. ^ "Gregorian/Hijri Calendar for 1436". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  5. ^ "2016 Special Islamic Days". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  6. ^ "Gregorian/Hijri Calendar for 1437". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  7. ^ "2017 Special Islamic Days". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  8. ^ "Gregorian/Hijri Calendar for 1438". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  9. ^ "2018 Special Islamic Days". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
  10. ^ "Gregorian/Hijri Calendar for 1439". Islamic Finder. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 

Further reading

  • Leaman, Oliver, "Festivals of Love", in Muhammad in History, Thought, and Culture: An Encyclopedia of the Prophet of God (2 vols.), Edited by C. Fitzpatrick and A. Walker, Santa Barbara, ABC-CLIO, 2014, Vol I, pp. 197-199.

External links

  • The Umm al-Qura Calendar of Saudi Arabia (with date converter valid from 1937 to 2077)
  • The Islamic Calendar/Hijri Calendar for Mecca
  • Eid ul Adha
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.