List of germanic tribes


This List of Germanic Tribes includes names of populations speaking Germanic languages or otherwise considered Germanic in sources from the late 1st millennium BC to the early 2nd millennium AD. They do not necessarily represent contemporaneous, distinct or Germanic-speaking populations or have common ancestral populations. Some closely fit the concept of a tribe. Others are confederations or even unions of tribes. Some may not have spoken Germanic at all, but were bundled by the sources with the Germanic speakers. Some were undoubtedly of mixed culture. They may have assimilated to Germanic or to other cultures from Germanic.

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A

Name Sources Variants Location Modern Name
Adogit[1] Jordanes, Getica, III.19-21 Two possibilities:
  1. *Ādogii < *Andogii
  2. *Hálogi
Northern Norway, both possibilities:
  1. Hålogaland, peopled by the Kven, a Finnic people, in the mid 1st millennium
  2. Vesterålen's Germanic People
Two possible modern reflexes:
  1. Andō, an island and part of Vesterålen
  2. Háleygir, people of Hålogaland
Aelvaeones[2] Ptolemy, Geography, 2.11.9 Ailouaiones, Helvaeonae, Helveconae, Helvecones Language unknown, possibly Old Prussian, possibly Germanic. Two possible locations:
  1. Prussia, formerly German, now Polish, around Elbing
  2. Silesia, formerly German, now Polish, as one of Tacitus' Lugii
Possibly Elblag, Poland
Aeragnaricii
Ahelmil
Alemanni
Ambrones (possibly Celtic)
Ampsivarii
Angles
Angrivarii
Arochi
Atuatuci
Augandzi
Avarpi
Aviones

B

Name Sources Variants Location Modern Name
Baemi
Baetasi
Banochaemae
Batavi
Batini
Bavarii
Bergio
Brisgavi
Brondings
Bructeri
Burgundiones
Buri

C

Caeroesi, Calucones, Canninefates, Casuari, Caritni, Chaedini, Chaemae, Chaetuori, Chali, Chamavi, Charudes, Chasuarii, Chattuarii, Chauci, Cherusci, Chatti, Cimbri (possibly Celtic), Cobandi, Condrusi, Corconti, Curiones

D

Danduti, Dani, Dauciones, Diduni, Dulgubnii

E

Eburones, Eudoses, Eunixi, Evagres

F

Favonae, Fervir, Firaesi, Fosi, Franks, Frisii, Fundusi

G

Gambrivii, Gauthigoth, Geats, Gepidae, Grannii, Greuthungi, Gutes

H

Hallin, Harii, Hasdingi, Helisii, Helveconae, Heruli, Hermunduri, Hilleviones

I

Ingriones, Ingvaeones (North Sea Germans), Intuergi, Irminones (Elbe Germans), Istvaeones (Rhine-Weser Germans)

J

Jutes, Juthungi

L

Lacringi, Landi, Lemovii, Lentienses, Levoni, Lombards (or Langobardes), Liothida, Lugii

M

Manimi, Marcomanni, Marsi, Marsaci, Marsigni, Marvingi, Mattiaci, Mixi, Mugilones

N

Naharvali, Narisci or Naristi, Nemetes, Nertereanes, Nervii (possibly not Germanic), Njars, Nuitones

O

Ostrogoths, Otingis

P

Paemani (or Caemani), Pharodini

Q

Quadi

R

Racatae, Racatriae, Ranrike (or Ragnaricii or Ranii), Raumarici, Reudigni, Ripuarii, Rugii, Rus', Ruticli

S

Sabalingi, Salii (or Salian Franks), Saxons, Scirii, Segni, Semnoni or Semnones, Sibini, Sidini, Sigulones, Silingi, Sitones, Suarini or Suardones, Suebi or Suevi, Suetidi, Suiones, Sugambri (or Sicambri), Sunici

T

Taetel, Tencteri, Teuriochaemae, Teutonoari, Teutons, Thervingi, Theustes, Thuringii, Toxandri, Treveri (possibly Celtic), Triboci, Tubanti, Tungri, Turcilingi, Turoni

U

Ubii, Ulmerugi, Usipetes, Usipi (or Usippi)

V

Vagoth, Vandals, Vangiones, Vargiones, Varini, Varisci, Vinoviloth, Viruni, Visburgi, Visigoths, Vispi

Z

Zumi

Mythical founders

Template:See Many of the authors relating ethnic names of Germanic peoples speculated concerning their origin, from the earliest writers to approximately the Renaissance. One cross-cultural approach over this more than a millennium of historical speculation was to assign an eponymous ancestor of the same name as, or reconstructed from, the name of the people. For example, Hellen was the founder of the Hellenes.

Although some Enlightenment historians continued to repeat these ancient stories as though fact, today they are recognized as manifestly mythological. There was, for example, no Franko, or Francio, ancestor of the Franks. The convergence of data from history, linguistics and archaeology have made this conclusion inevitable. A list of the mythical founders of Germanic peoples follows.

See also

Ancient Germanic culture portal

References

External links

Some tribal maps of Germania can be found at:

  • Germania of Tacitus
  • A speculative Findlay map of 1849
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