World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Later Tang

Tang / Later Tang
唐 / 后唐

 

 

 

923–937
 

 

     Later Tang 后唐
Capital Daming
(923)
Luoyang
(923–936)
Languages Chinese
Government Monarchy
Emperor
 •  923–926 Li Cunxu (Zhuangzong)
 •  926–933 Li Siyuan (Mingzong)
 •  933–934 Li Conghou
 •  934–936 Li Congke
Historical era Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period
 •  Established in Daming May 923
 •  Overthrown by Khitan and Shi Jingtang January 11, 937
Today part of  China
The preceding entity of the Later Tang was the State of Jin, which was established by Li Keyong in 895 under the Tang Dynasty and existed as a state in 907–923.

Tang, known in history as Later Tang, was a short-lived imperial dynasty that lasted from 923 to 936 during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period in the history of China.[1]

The first three of Later Tang's four emperors were ethnically sinicized Shatuo.[2] The name Tang was used to legitimize itself as the restorer of the Tang dynasty (618–907). Although Later Tang officially began in 923, the dynasty already existed in the years before, as a polity called Jin (907–923).

At its height, Later Tang controlled most of northern China.

Contents

  • Formation of the Later Tang 1
  • Course of the Later Tang 2
  • Extent of Later Tang territories 3
  • Rulers of the Later Tang 4
  • Later Tang rulers family tree 5
  • References 6

Formation of the Later Tang

From the fall of the Tang Dynasty in 907, a rivalry had developed between the successor Later Liang, formed by Zhu Wen, and the State of Jin, formed by Li Keyong, in present-day Shanxi. The rivalry survived the death of Li Keyong, whose son Li Cunxu continued to expand Jin territories at the expense of the Later Liang.

Li Keyong forged an alliance with the powerful Khitan, like the Shatuo a people of the northern steppe, a relationship that figured significantly in the expansion and ultimate triumph of the Shatuo. Li Cunxu was successful in overthrowing the Later Liang in 923 and proclaimed himself emperor of the Later Tang, which he referred to as the “Restored Tang”. As a part of “restoring the Tang”, the capital was moved back to the old Tang eastern seat of Luoyang.

Course of the Later Tang

The Later Tang was a short-lived regime, lasting only thirteen years. Li Cunxu himself lived only three years after the founding of the dynasty, having been killed during an officer’s rebellion in 926. Li Siyuan, the adopted son of Li Keyong, took over the dynasty, but relations with the Khitan had fallen sour. Internal struggles typified the remaining ten years of the dynasty, ending with its toppling in 936 when Shi Jingtang, son-in-law of Li Siyuan and a fellow Shatuo, rebelled, stormed the capital with the help of Khitan troops, and founded the Later Jin.

Extent of Later Tang territories

The Later Tang controlled considerably more territory at its height than did the Later Liang. It extended to all the northern territories controlled by the Later Liang as well as its own base in Shanxi. It also had control over the areas around Beijing and Shaanxi, which were not entirely under the control of the Later Liang. The largest expansion of the Later Tang occurred in 925 when they conquered the Former Shu State, centered in present-day Sichuan. However, as Later Tang power was waning, a Later Shu state formed in 934, a year before the fall of the Later Tang.

Rulers of the Later Tang

Temple names Posthumous names Family names and given name Chinese naming conventions Durations of reigns Era names and their according durations
Zhuāngzōng (莊宗) too tedious; thus, not used when referring to this sovereign Lǐ Cúnxù (李存勗) Family name and given name 923–926 Tóngguāng (同光) 923–926
Míngzōng (明宗) too tedious; thus, not used when referring to this sovereign Lǐ Sìyuán (李嗣源) or Lǐ Dǎn (李亶) Family name and given name 926–933 Tiānchéng (天成) 926–930
Chángxīng (長興) 930–933
did not exist Mǐn (閔) Lǐ Cónghòu (李從厚) Family name and given name 933–934 Yìngshùn (應順) 933–934
did not exist Mòdì (末帝) Lǐ Cóngkē (李從珂) Family name and given name 934–937 Qīngtaì (清泰) 934–937

Later Tang rulers family tree

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.