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John Updike

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John Updike

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  • ^ "John Updike Biography". Academy of Achievement. Retrieved 30 January 2010.
  • ^ Barrett, Andrea (14 January 1990). "Nibbled at By Neighbors". The New York Times. Retrieved 7 May 2010. 
  • ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Boswell, Marshall. "John Updike", The Literary Encyclopedia, March 18, 2004
  • ^ Heer, Jeet (March 20, 2004), "John Updike's animated ambitions", The Guardian .
  • ^ "John Updike", Religion and Ethics NewsWeekly (PBS) (812), 19 November 2004 .
  • ^ The Ipswich Chronicle. 25 April 1968. Letter: "Updike 'flatly denies' that Tarbox is Ipswich."
  • ^ "John Updike: The Ipswich Connection". The Ipswich Chronicle. 9 February 2009. 
  • ^ a b "National Book Awards – 1964". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 2012-03-11. (With acceptance speech by Updike and essay by Harold Augenbraum from the Awards 60-year anniversary blog.)
  • ^ All-Time 100 Novels
  • ^ Gross, Terry (2004). Being square. All I did was ask: Conversations with writers, actors, musicians, and artists (p. 24). New York, NY: Hyperion.
  • ^ a b Charlie Rose interview, 24 October 1995
  • ^ "Farewell, King John of Suburbia", New Statesman, 29 January 2009
  • ^ http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/1978/dec/21/updike-le-noir/
  • ^ a b "National Book Awards – 1982". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 2012-03-11. (With essays by Amity Gaige and Nancy Werlin from the Awards 60-year anniversary blog.)
  • ^ Michiko Kakutani, "Books of the Times: 'The Widows of Eastwick'", New York Times, 19 October 2008
  • ^ Harold Bloom, The Western Canon: The Books and Schools of the Ages (1994), "The Chaotic Age: The United States," Riverhead Trade.
  • ^ Martin Amis, " When Amis met Updike ...", The Guardian, 1 February 2009
  • ^ Jack De Bellis (ed.), The John Updike Encyclopedia (2000), "Bech, Henry", pp. 52–53.
  • ^ John Updike, "Introduction", Rabbit Angstrom (1995), Everyman's Library.
  • ^ interviewCharlie Rose on YouTube, 1996
  • ^ a b c Adam Gopnik, "Postscript: John Updike", The New Yorker, 9 February 2009
  • ^ Award Winners—The PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction. Powell's Books, Powells.com
  • ^ a b Howard, Jennifer (23 May 2008). "In Jefferson Lecture, Updike Says American Art Is Known by Its Insecurity". Chronicle of Higher Education. 
  • ^ a b Tolson, Jay (23 May 2008). "John Updike on American Art". U.S. News & World Report. 
  • ^ http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2012/06/updikes-roots-and-evolution/
  • ^ Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index. Social Security Administration.
  • ^
  • ^ a b John Updike: The Poetry Foundation, archive
  • ^ Poets.org: John Updike
  • ^ Gavin Ewart, "Making it strange", New York Times, 28 April 1985
  • ^ Charles McGrath, "Reading Updike's Last Words, Aloud", New York Times, 3 April 2009
  • ^ John Keenan, "The clarity of Updike's poetry should not obscure its class", The Guardian, 12 March 2009
  • ^ James Atlas, "Towards the Transhuman", London Review of Books, 2 February 1984
  • ^ "Remembering Updike: The Gospel According to John", New Yorker online
  • ^ a b Mary Rourke, " John Updike dies at 76; Pulitzer-winning author", Los Angeles Times, 28 January 2009
  • ^ ZZ Packer, " Remembering Updike", New Yorker online
  • ^ a b Charles McGrath, "John Updike's Mighty Pen", New York Times, 31 January 2009
  • ^ Alex Carnevale, "Literary Feuds: Toni Morrison is John Updike's Latest Lit-Fit Victim", October 2008, Gawker.com
  • ^ "Updike takes a swipe at Toni Morrison", The First Post, 29 October 2008
  • ^ John Updike, "Dreamy Wilderness", New Yorker, 3 November 2008
  • ^ a b Wyatt Mason, "Among the reviewers: John Updike and the book-review bugaboo", Harper's, December 2007
  • ^ "John Updike". New York Review of Books. Nybooks.com. Retrieved 30 January 2010.
  • ^ a b John Updike, "The Clarity of Things", National Endowment for the Humanities
  • ^ Martin Amis, "He took the novel onto another plane of intimacy", Guardian, 28 January 2009
  • ^ "What Is the Best Work of American Fiction of the Last 25 Years?" New York Times, 21 May 2006, "a couple of hundred prominent writers, critics, editors and other literary sages" listed the Rabbit series as one of the few greatest works of modern American fiction.
  • ^ a b c Thomas Karshan, "Batsy", London Review of Books, 31 March 2005
  • ^ a b c Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, "John Updike, a Lyrical Writer of the Middle Class, Dies at 76", New York Times, 28 January 2009
  • ^ Book magazine, March/April 2002, "100 Best Fictional Characters since 1900", via NPR
  • ^ "Everyman's Library: Authors", Random House
  • ^ Tracy Jan, "Harvard buys Updike archive", Boston Globe, 7 October 2009
  • ^ "The John Updike Society Homepage". The John Updike Society. Retrieved 9 December 2009.
  • ^ "The John Updike Society First Biennial Conference." Alvernia University. Retrieved 9 December 2009.
  • ^ Ian McEwan, "On John Updike", New York Review of Books Vol 56 No 4, 12 March 2009
  • ^ Jonathan Raban, The Oxford Book of the Sea (1993), Oxford University Press, pp. 509–517.
  • ^ "John Updike: 2008 Jefferson Lecture", National Endowment for the Humanities
  • ^ James Wood, The Broken Estate: Essays on Literature and Belief (2000), "John Updike's Complacent God", Modern Library, pp. 192.
  • ^ a b James Wood, "Gossip in Gilt", London Review of Books, 19 April 2001
  • ^ Richard Eder, "The Paris Interviews", New York Times, 25 December 2007.
  • ^ Harold Bloom, ed., Modern Critical Views of John Updike, "Introduction," Chelsea House, New York, 1987.
  • ^ Dick Cavett, "Writers Bloc: When Updike and Cheever Came to Visit", New York Times, 13 February 2009. Video 14 October 1981
  • ^ S. Future, "Updike", The Fiction Circus, 27 January 2009,
  • ^ James Wolcott, "Caretaker/Pallbearer", London Review of Books, 1 January 2009
  • ^ Gore Vidal, "Rabbit's own burrow", Times Literary Supplement, 26 April 1996
  • ^ Brand, Madeleine. Robert B. Silvers interview for NPR Remembrances: "John Updike: The Shy Man And Great Writer". NPR, Day to Day, 27 January 2009
  • ^ Lorrie Moore, "Home Truths", New York Review of Books, 20 November 2003
  • ^ Potter, Christy. Unraveling the Mysterious Appeal of John Updike. http://www.ChristytheWriter.com/?p=2611 2011
  • ^ John Updike, Rabbit at Rest (1990), Knopf, pp. 308
  • ^ The Economist, "An American subversive", 29 January 2009
  • ^ a b c d Jack De Bellis (ed.), "Mortality and Immortality", The John Updike Encyclopedia (2000), pp. 286. See here for many subsequent quotes and citations on death.
  • ^ Robert McCrun, "John Updike was of a generation that changed the literary landscape irrevocably," The Guardian, 1 February 2009
  • ^ John Updike, "The Dogwood Tree", Assorted Prose (1965), Knopf.
  • ^ Time, " View from the Catacombs", 26 April 1968, pp. 6
  • ^ a b The Bat Segundo Show, Show #50, John Updike
  • ^ Antonya Nelson, "Remembering Updike", New Yorker online
  • ^ ZZ Packer, "Remembering Updike", New Yorker online
  • ^ Julian Barnes, "Remembering Updike", New Yorker online
  • ^ Jack De Bellis (ed.), "More Matter", The John Updike Encyclopedia (2000), pp. 281.
  • ^ Kakutani, Michiko (27 January 2009), "An Appraisal: A Relentless Updike Mapped America 's Mysteries", The New York Times .
  • ^ Updike, John (1995), "Perfection Wasted", Collected Poems: 1953–1993, Knopf .
  • ^ coverTime26 April 1968 , coverTime18 October 1982
  • ^ Nicholson Baker, U and I: A True Story, Random House, 1991, Google Books
  • ^ ECHO Journal IV/2, Kajikawa, "Review: 8 Mile, " Rap, Rabbit, Rap,"
  • ^ "David Levine Gallery". New York Review of Books. Nybooks.com. Retrieved 30 January 2010.
  • ^ All awards listed at The Centaurian Updike homepage, "Awards, Prizes, and Honors", 17 March 2009
  • ^ "Distinguished Contribution to American Letters". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 2012-03-11. (With acceptance speech by Updike and introduction by Paul LeClerc.)
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