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Hypocotyl

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Title: Hypocotyl  
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Subject: Epicotyl, Seedling, Lepidium meyenii, Soybean, BBCH-scale (bean)
Collection: Plant Anatomy, Plant Morphology, Plant Reproduction
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Hypocotyl

Diagram of Scouler's willow (Salix scouleriana) seed, indicating position of hypocotyl.

The hypocotyl (short for "hypocotyledonous stem",[1] meaning "below seed leaf") is the stem of a germinating seedling, found below the cotyledons (seed leaves) and above the radicle (root).

Contents

  • Dicots 1
  • Monocots 2
  • Storage organ 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Dicots

As the plant stem.

Monocots

The early development of a monocot seedling like cereals and other grasses is somewhat different. A structure called the coleoptile, essentially a part of the cotyledon, protects the young stem and plumule as growth pushes them up through the soil. A mesocotyl—that part of the young plant that lies between the seed (which remains buried) and the plumule—extends the shoot up to the soil surface, where secondary roots develop from just beneath the plumule. The primary root from the radicle may then fail to develop further. The mesocotyl is considered to be partly hypocotyl and partly cotyledon (see seed).

Not all monocots develop like the grasses. The onion develops in a manner similar to the first sequence described above, the seed coat and endosperm (stored food reserve) pulled upwards as the cotyledon extends. Later, the first true leaf grows from the node between the radicle and the sheath-like cotyledon, breaking through the cotyledon to grow past it.

Storage organ

In some plants, the hypocotyl becomes enlarged as a tuber.

See also

References

  1. ^ "hypocotyl".   (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
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