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Hinglajgarh

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Title: Hinglajgarh  
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Subject: Forts in India, Chapar Ghata, Jhansi Fort, Pallipuram Fort, Rohtasgarh Fort
Collection: Forts in Madhya Pradesh, Mandsaur District
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Hinglajgarh

The Hinglaj goddess
Hinglaj Fort Fatehburj
Hinglaj Fort Darbar Hall
Hinglaj Fort Surajkund
Hinglaj Fort surrounded by deep forests
Hinglaj Fort Rani Mahal
Hinglajgarh Tirtham, a Deep Jyoti Stambh

Hinglajgarh (Hindi: हिंगलाजगढ़) or Hinglaj Fort (Hindi: हिंगलाज क़िला Hinglaj Qila) is an ancient fort situated near village Navali in Bhanpura tehsil of Mandsaur district in Madhya Pradesh. Its coordinates are latitude 25°30' N and Longitude 65°31' E. It is situated 165 km from Mandsaur town and 26 km from Bhanpura town in Madhya Pradesh.[1] This fort was at its peak of grandeur during Parmara rule.[2] There are many artistic sculptures of various periods in this fort. The Nandi and Uma-Maheshwar sculptures were sent from there to France and Washington for display in India festivals and left a mark at international levels.[3] The Hinglajgarh was the centre of excellence in craftsmanship of sculptures for about 800 years. The statues recovered from this fort are from the Guptas period to Parmara period. The most ancient statues are from 4th–5th century AD.[4]

Origin of name

Hinglajgarh gets name after the goddess Hinglaj Devi, the kuldevi of Kshatriyas. Hinglaj Mata temple is situated in the Hinglajgarh.[5] Originally temple located at Hinglaj (Urdu: ﮨنگلاج‎) is an important Hindu pilgrimage place in Balochistan, Pakistan. It is situated in Balochistan province about 250 km north-west of Karachi.[6] The Kshatriyas in ancient times had movements between baluchistan and India. The Mauri rulers founded the temple of Hinglaj Mata as she was their kuladevi. Initially this area was known as 'Hinglaj Tekri' but later the Mauri rulers built a fort here and this came to be known as Hinglajgarh or Hinglaj Fort.[3][7]

History

The ancient inscriptions in the Pali Buddhist character have been discovered in various parts of Rajasthan of the race of Taxak or Tak, relating to the tribe Mori and Parmara are their descendants. Taxak Mori was the lord of Chittor from very early period.[8][9]

The Huna Kingdom of Sialkot (of Mihir Kula 515-540 AD), destroyed by Yashodharman, was subsequently seized by a new dynasty of kshatriyas called Tak or Taxaka. The Taxak Mori as being lords of Chittor from very early period and few generations after the Guhilots supplanted the Moris, this palladium of Hindu liberty was assailed by the arms of Islam. (725-35) we find amongst the numerous defenders who appear to have considered the cause of Chittor their own the Tak from Asirgarh. This race appears to have retained possession of Asirgarh for at least two centuries after this event as its chieftain was one of the most conspicuous leaders in the array of Prithvi Raj. In the poems of Chandar he is called the "Standard, bearer, Tak of Asir." [10]

Hinglaj Fort became very strategic during the Parmara rule and they strengthen it. In 1281 the Hada ruler halu occupied it, and later it came under Chandrawat rulers. Mention of Haveli of Gopal Singh, a Chandrawat ruler, is found in the patnama of Chandrawats.[11] In 1773 the Holkar Queen Ahilya Bai defeated Laxman Singh Chandrawat and occupied it. The fort was renovated during Holkar rule along with Hinglaj Mata Temple, Rama Temple, and Shiva Temple. Though various dynasties occupied the fort but it was never used as a permanent capital. It was mainly used as a shelter by various rulers. This is the reason why there are not many palaces here.[12]

The Hinglaj Fort has four gates namely Patanpol, Surajpol, Katrapol and Mandaleshwaripol. The first three gates (pol) are east facing whereas last, Mandaleshwaripol, is west facing. There is storage of water in a grand tank known as Surajkund. Local tradition goes that Gotri Bhil was killed here, therefor the smarak built here is worshiped by Bhils.[12]

In the southern part of the Hinglaj Fort is situated Hinglaj Mata temple, Rama-Hanuman Temple, Darbar Kaksha (Kachhari), Rani Mahal and Shiva Temple. There is a big Burj here known as Fateh Burj.[13] There are also two towers called Tirtham, which used to be used as means of communication with distant places through light.

References

  1. ^ Rajendra Verma:Mandsaur District Gazetteer, p. 289
  2. ^ Ramlal Kanwal:Prachin Malwa mein Vastukala, p. 185
  3. ^ a b Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 38
  4. ^ Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 42
  5. ^ L.D.Dhariwal (Ed): Indore State Gazetteer, Vol. 2, p. 24
  6. ^ Hindus in Pakistan - BBC News
  7. ^ Puran Sahgal:Dashpur Janapad mein Arawali ke Sudrarh Durg Prachir, Shodh Patra, Sangoshthi, Mandsaur, 1991, p. 104
  8. ^ James Tod, Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, p.126
  9. ^ Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas – The Ancient Rulers of India, Their Origins and History (The History of the Indigenous people of India Vol. 2), Published by Originals (an imprint of Low Price Publications), Delhi, 2002, ISBN 81-7536-287-1, p.171
  10. ^ Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas – The Ancient Rulers of India, Their Origins and History (The History of the Indigenous people of India Vol. 2), Published by Originals (an imprint of Low Price Publications), Delhi, 2002, ISBN 81-7536-287-1, p.148
  11. ^ News Letter Published by Intec No. 1, Nimach Hinglajgarh Chapter, March April 1991, p. 10
  12. ^ a b Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 39
  13. ^ Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 40

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