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Euglenozoa

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Euglenozoa

Euglenozoa
Two Euglena
Scientific classification
Domain: Eukarya
(unranked): Excavata
Phylum: Euglenozoa
Cavalier-Smith, 1981[1]
Classes and unplaced genera

Euglenoidea
Kinetoplastea
Diplonemea
Postgaardi
Calkinsia

Synonyms
  • Euglenoida Cavalier-Smith, 1978

The Euglenozoa are a large group of flagellate protozoa. They include a variety of common free-living species, as well as a few important parasites, some of which infect humans. There are two main subgroups, the euglenids and kinetoplastids. Euglenozoa are unicellular, mostly around 15-40 µm in size, although some euglenids get up to 500 µm long.[2]

Structure

Most euglenozoa have two flagella, which are inserted parallel to one another in an apical or subapical pocket. In some these are associated with a microtubules that arise from the flagellar bases; the other two support the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the cell.[3]

Some other euglenozoa feed through absorption, and many euglenids possess chloroplasts and so obtain energy through photosynthesis. These chloroplasts are surrounded by three membranes and contain chlorophylls A and B, along with other pigments, so are probably derived from a captured green alga. Reproduction occurs exclusively through cell division. During mitosis, the nuclear membrane remains intact, and the spindle microtubules form inside of it.[3]

The group is characterized by the ultrastructure of the flagella. In addition to the normal supporting microtubules or axoneme, each contains a rod (called paraxonemal), which has a tubular structure in one flagellum and a latticed structure in the other. Based on this, two smaller groups have been included here: the diplonemids and Postgaardi.[4]

Classification

The euglenozoa are generally accepted as monophyletic. They are related to Percolozoa; the two share mitochondria with disk-shaped cristae, which only occurs in a few other groups.[5] Both probably belong to a larger group of eukaryotes called the excavates.[6] This grouping, though, has been challenged.[7]

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ a b
  4. ^
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External links

  • Tree of Life: Euglenozoa


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