World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Cratylus

Cratylus (; Ancient Greek: Κρατύλος, Kratylos) was an ancient Athenian philosopher from the mid-late 5th century BCE, known mostly through his portrayal in Plato's dialogue Cratylus. He was a radical proponent of Heraclitean philosophy and influenced the young Plato.

Contents

  • Life 1
  • Philosophy 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Life

Little is known of Cratylus beyond his status as a disciple of Heraclitus of Ephesus, Asia Minor. The modern biographical tradition has not reached consensus on his approximate date of birth, arguing alternately for an age comparable roughly either to Plato or Socrates.[1] Cratylus is mentioned in Aristotle's Metaphysics in a passage which seems to imply that Cratylus was an established and active philosopher in Athens during the mid-late 5th century,[1] and that Plato himself became briefly interested in his work prior to aligning with Socrates.

Philosophy

In Cratylus' eponymous Platonic dialogue, the character of Socrates states Heraclitus' proclamation that one cannot step twice into the same stream.[2] According to Aristotle, Cratylus went a step beyond his master's doctrine and proclaimed that it cannot even be done once.[3] The contemporary philosophy Cratylism is based on a reconstructed version of Cratylus' theories of flux and language as they appear in Plato's dialogue and has been influential to Eastern thinkers, including Buddhist semioticians.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Debra Nails. The People of Plato: A prosopography of Plato and other Socratics. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2002, pp. 105
  2. ^ Plato, Cratylus, 402a
  3. ^ Aristotle, Metaphysics, 4.5 1010a10-15
  4. ^ Fabio Rambelli. A Buddhist Theory of Semiotics. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2013, pp. 179


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.