Candomblé Jejé

Candomblé Jejé, also known as Brazilian Vodum, is one of the major branches (nations) of Candomblé. It developed in the Portuguese Empire among Fon and Ewe slaves. Jejé is a Yoruba word meaning stranger, which is what the Fon and Ewe slaves represented to the Yoruba slaves.

Vodums

Jejé spirits are called Vodums (sing. Vodum). According to tradition, they were introduced into the King Agajah in the 18th century.

Jejé Vodums are sometimes cultuated in houses of other nations by different names. For instance, the Vodum Dan or Bessen is called Oxumarê in Candomblé Ketu. Conversely, the Ketu Orixás may be cultuated in Jejé houses, but retain their names.

Voduns are organized into families:

Dan Yewá
Togun Tohossou Nohê Aikunguman
Tobossi Sakpata Wealth Voduns
Hevioso Aveji-Dá Nanã
Marine Naés Freshwater Naés Eku and Awun
Mawu-Lisa Hohos -

See also


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