Adelaide, Countess of Vermandois

Adelaide of Vermandois (1062–1122) was suo jure Countess of Vermandois and Valois and the last member of the Carolingian dynasty.

Adelaide was the daughter of Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois, and Adele of Valois and of the Vexin.[1] Her brother was Eudes, Count of Vermandois (+ after 1085), married to Hedwig. Later became Lord of Saint-Simon by marriage.

Adelaide married firstly Hugh Magnus, son of the Capetian King Henry I of France and younger brother of Philip I of France. By this marriage she had nine children:

  • Matilda(1080–1130), married Ralph I of Beaugency
  • Beatrice (1082 – after 1144), married Hugh III of Gournay
  • Elizabeth of Vermandois, Countess of Leicester (1081–1131)
  • Ralph I (1085–1152)
  • Constance (born 1086, date of death unknown), married Godfrey de la Ferté-Gaucher
  • Agnes (1090–1125), married Boniface of Savone
  • Henry (1091–1130), Lord of Chaumont en Vexin
  • Simon (1093–1148)
  • William, possibly married to Isabella, illegitimate daughter of King Louis VI of France

In 1104, she married secondly Renaud II, Count of Clermont. By this marriage she had one daughter, Margaret, who married Charles I, Count of Flanders.

In 1102, Adelaide was succeeded by her son, Ralph I. Adelaide died in 1122 and the Carolingian dynasty died out with her.

References

Adelaide, Countess of Vermandois
Born: 1062 Died: 1122
French nobility
Preceded by
Otto
Countess of Vermandois;
Countess of Valois
with Hugh I
1085–1102
Succeeded by
Ralph I


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