Bernard Hebda

The Most Reverend
Bernard Anthony Hebda
Coadjutor Archbishop of Newark
See Newark
Appointed September 24, 2013 (Coadjutor)
Predecessor John J. Myers
Successor incumbent
Orders
Ordination July 1, 1989
by Donald Wuerl
Consecration December 1, 2009
by Allen Henry Vigneron
Personal details
Born (1959-09-03) September 3, 1959
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Previous post
Motto ONLY JESUS
Coat of arms }
Styles of
Bernard Hebda
Reference style The Most Reverend
Spoken style Your Excellency
Religious style Your Excellency
Posthumous style not applicable

Bernard Anthony Hebda (born September 3, 1959) is the Coadjutor Archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark, in Newark, New Jersey, where he will assist and eventually succeed Archbishop John J. Myers. He formerly served as the fourth Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Gaylord. He was consecrated as a Bishop and installed as Bishop of Gaylord on December 1, 2009 at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Gaylord. He had previously served as Undersecretary (third in charge) of the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts, an agency of the Roman Curia in charge of the correct interpretation of the laws of the Catholic Church, especially Canon Law.[1][2]

Biography

Early life and education

Hebda was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1959 in the community of Brookline. He attended South Hills Catholic High School (now Seton-La Salle Catholic High School), and then attended Harvard University, earning a BA in 1980 in Political Science. He later earned a Juris Doctor from Columbia Law School at the Parker School of Foreign and Comparative Law in 1983.

He entered the seminary and studied philosophy at the Saint Paul Seminary in Pittsburgh from 1984 to 1985. He was sent to Rome, where he resided at the Pontifical North American College and attended the Pontifical Gregorian University, obtaining a Bachelor of Sacred Theology (1985–1988) and then a licentiate in Canon Law (1988–1990).

Ordination and early career

He was ordained a priest on July 1, 1989 for the Diocese of Pittsburgh, where he held the following positions: assistant priest at the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary Parish in Ellwood City (1989), personal secretary of the then-Bishop of Pittsburgh, Donald Wuerl and Master of Ceremonies (1990–1992), and pastor in solidum at the Prince of Peace Parish in Pittsburgh (South Side) (1992–1995), Judge of the Diocesan Tribunal (1992–1996), and Director of the Newman Center at Slippery Rock University (1995–1996).

He was called to Rome to work at the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts on September 10, 1996. On February 16, 2000 he was appointed as a Chaplain of His Holiness with the title Monsignor. From 2003 he served as under-secretary of the Pontifical Council.

In Rome, Hebda was also an adjunct spiritual director at the Pontifical North American College and confessor to the Missionaries of Charity. He lived at the Villa Stritch, a residence for American priests working in the Holy See. Hebda presided at Vespers at the Pontifical North American College on October 16, 2009. During the banquet that followed the liturgy, the College community presented him with a pectoral cross and crosier.

Besides English, he speaks Italian and knows Latin, French, and Spanish.

Bishop of Gaylord, Michigan

On October 7, 2009 Hebda was named as the fourth bishop of Gaylord.[3]

With Hebda's appointment, a record seven Pittsburghers now lead US dioceses, including Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, Donald Wuerl of Washington D.C., David Zubik of Pittsburgh, Thomas Tobin of Providence, Paul Bradley of Kalamazoo and Edward J. Burns of Juneau. Hebda was consecrated a bishop and installed on December 1, 2009 at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Gaylord.

Coadjutor Archbishop of Newark, New Jersey

Hebda was appointed as Coadjutor Archbishop of Newark on September 24, 2013. He was welcomed with a special Mass on November 5, 2013 in Newark.[4]

See also

References

  • Diocesan biography of Bp. Hebda
  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Nora Jonkers (29 September 2013). "Parish noticeboard". catholicweekly.com.au. Archived from the original on Dec 23, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Gaylord's new bishop coming from Pittsburgh". Detroit News. 2009-10-07. Retrieved 2009-10-07. The Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh on Wednesday announced Pope Benedict XVI's appointment of Monsignor Bernard Hebda as bishop in Gaylord, Mich. Church officials in Michigan have not immediately announced plans for his ordination and installation as bishop. 
  4. ^ William Perlman (November 5, 2013). "Parishioners welcome Archbishop Bernard Hebda at a special Mass in Newark". NJ.com. 

External links

  • Roman Catholic Diocese of Gaylord, Michigan
  • Bishop Bernard Anthony Hebda from Catholic Hierarchy.org

Episcopal succession

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John J. Myers
Coadjutor Archbishop of Newark
2013-Present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Patrick R. Cooney
Bishop of Gaylord
2009–2013
Succeeded by
Steven J. Raica


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