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United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008

 

United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008

The 2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who will represent the state of Alabama in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 4, 2009 until January 3, 2011.

Alabama has seven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of five Republicans and two Democrats. It is now four Republicans and three Democrats. District 2 changed party (from open Republican to Democratic).

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008[1][2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 1,120,903 60.42% 4 –1
Democratic 718,367 38.72% 3 +1
Independent 15,998 0.86% 0 0
Valid votes 1,855,268 88.11%
Invalid or blank votes 250,354 11.89%
Totals 2,105,622 100.00% 7
Voter turnout 74.11%

District 1

The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested. However, Democrat Thomas Fuller withdrew from the race on June 12, 2008, stating he was unable to wage a creditable campaign in the district.[3]

CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.[4]

  • Alabama District 1 race from OurCampaigns.org
  • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2008[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (incumbent) 210,660 98.27%
Independent Write-in candidates 3,707 1.73%
Totals 214,367 100.00%
Republican hold

District 2

This district covers southeastern Alabama, including Dothan and Montgomery. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'No Clear Favorite'. The Rothenberg Political Report rated it 'Pure Toss-Up'. The Cook Political Report ranked it 'Republican Toss Up'.

Republican Bobby Bright (D) (campaign website)

  • Jay Love (R) (campaign website)
  • 2nd district race ranking and background from CQ Politics
  • Alabama District 2 race from OurCampaigns.org
  • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
  • Love (R) vs Bright (D) graph of collected poll results from Pollster.com
  • Alabama's 2nd congressional district election, 2008[1]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Democratic Bobby Bright 144,368 50.23%
    Republican Jay Love 142,578 49.61%
    Independent Write-in candidates 448 0.16%
    Totals 287,394 100.00%
    Democratic gain from Republican

    District 3

    The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested.

    • Mike D. Rogers (R) - Incumbent (campaign website)
    • Joshua Segall (D) - Lawyer (campaign website)
    • Mark Layfield (Independent) - real estate broker, ex-pilot, Navy veteran and 2006 candidate

    CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Republican Favored'.[6]

    • 3rd district race ranking and background from CQ Politics
    • Alabama District 3 race from OurCampaigns.org
    • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
    • Rogers (R-i) vs Segall (D) graph of collected poll results from Pollster.com
    Alabama's 3rd congressional district election, 2008[1]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Republican Mike Rogers (incumbent) 142,708 54.03%
    Democratic Joshua Segall 121,080 45.84%
    Independent Write-in candidates 332 0.13%
    Totals 264,120 100.00%
    Republican hold

    District 4

    The Republican primary was uncontested, and Nick Sparks won against Greg Warren in the Democratic primary.

    • Robert Aderholt (R) - Incumbent (campaign website)
    • Nick Sparks (D) - attorney (campaign website)

    CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.[7]

    • Alabama District 4 race from OurCampaigns.org
    • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
    Alabama's 4th congressional district election, 2008[1]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Republican Robert Aderholt (incumbent) 196,741 74.76%
    Democratic Nick Sparks 66,077 25.11%
    Independent Write-in candidates 349 0.13%
    Totals 263,167 100.00%
    Republican hold

    District 5

    This district includes the counties of Colbert, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Jackson, and parts of Morgan. Democratic incumbent Bud Cramer has represented the district since 1990. He did not seek reelection and endorsed State Senator Parker Griffith. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'No Clear Favorite'. The Rothenberg Political Report rated it 'Pure Toss-Up'. The Cook Political Report ranked it 'Democrat Toss Up'.

    In the June 3, 2008 primary election, there were eight candidates running for the seat. On the Democratic side, State Senator Dr. Parker Griffith defeated physicist David Maker ( website), carrying 90% of the vote. Wayne Parker won the Republican runoff on July 15th against attorney Cheryl Baswell Guthrie (campaign website).[5] In the primary, Wayne Parker had failed to gain the necessary 51% of the vote to avoid the runoff. Guthrie had carried 18% of the vote. Wayne Parker is a son-in-law of former U.S. Representative Bill Archer of Texas, once chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.

    A year after his election, Griffith switched parties and ran for a second term in the 2010 Republican primary.


    • Parker Griffith (D) - State Senator, businessman, and Huntsville's first radiation oncologist (campaign website)
    • Wayne Parker (R) - Insurance executive, lost to Cramer in 1994 and 1996 (campaign website)
    • 5th District race ranking and background from CQ Politics
    • Alabama District 5 race from OurCampaigns.org
    • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
    • LoParker (R) vs Griffith (D) graph of collected poll results from Pollster.com
    Alabama's 5th congressional district election, 2008[1]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Democratic Parker Griffith 158,324 51.52%
    Republican Wayne Parker 147,314 47.94%
    Independent Write-in candidates 1,644 0.54%
    Totals 307,282 100.00%
    Democratic hold

    District 6

    The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested.

    CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.[8]

    • Alabama District 6 race from OurCampaigns.org
    • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
    Alabama's 6th congressional district election, 2008[1]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Republican Spencer Bachus (incumbent) 280,902 97.79%
    Independent Write-in candidates 6,335 2.21%
    Totals 287,237 100.00%
    Republican hold

    District 7

    The Democratic and Republican primaries were not contested.

    CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'.[9]

    • Alabama District 7 race from OurCampaigns.org
    • Campaign contributions from OpenSecrets.org
    Alabama's 6th congressional district election, 2008[1]
    Party Candidate Votes %
    Democratic Artur Davis (incumbent) 228,518 98.63%
    Independent Write-in candidates 3,183 1.37%
    Totals 231,701 100.00%
    Democratic hold

    References

    1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Certified General Election Results without write-in appendix" (PDF).  
    2. ^ "Voting Statistics: 2008 General Election" (PDF).  
    3. ^ AP, Democrat drops out of 1st District congressional race June 12, 2008
    4. ^ 1st district race ranking and details from CQ Politics
    5. ^ a b Alabama - Summary Vote Results AL.com, July 17, 2008
    6. ^ 3rd district race ranking and details from CQ Politics
    7. ^ 4th district race ranking and details from CQ Politics
    8. ^ 6th district race ranking and details from CQ Politics
    9. ^ 7th district race ranking and details from CQ Politics

    External links

    • United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2008 at DMOZ
    • U.S. Congress candidates for Alabama at Project Vote Smart
    • Alabama U.S. House Races from 2008 Race Tracker
    • Campaign contributions for Alabama congressional races from OpenSecrets.org
    • Election News from Alabama Live news media
    Preceded by
    2006 elections
    United States House elections in Alabama
    2008
    Succeeded by
    2010 elections
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