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550s

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550s

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 5th century6th century7th century
Decades: 520s 530s 540s550s560s 570s 580s
Years: 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559
550s-related
categories:
BirthsDeathsBy country
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

This is a list of events occurring in the 550s, ordered by year.

550

By place

Byzantine Empire

Europe

Persia

Asia

Mesoamerica

By topic

Arts and sciences

Religion

551

By place

Byzantine Empire

Europe

Persia

Asia

By topic

Arts and sciences

552

By place

Byzantine Empire

  • July 1Battle of Taginae: Narses crosses the Apennines with a Byzantine army (25,000 men). He is blocked by a Gothic force under king Totila near Taginae (Central Italy). In a narrow mountain valley, Narses deploys his army in a "crescent shaped" formation.[7] He dismounts his Lombard and Heruli cavalry mercenaries, placing them as a phalanx in the centre. On his left flank he sends out a mixed force of foot and horse archers to seize a dominant height. The Goths open the battle with a determined cavalry charge. Halted by enfilading fire from both sides, the attackers are thrown back in confusion on the infantry behind them. The Byzantine cataphracts (Clibanarii) sweep into the milling mass. More than 6,000 Goths, including Totila, are killed. The remnants flee, Narses proceeds to Rome, where he captures the city after a brief siege.
  • Emperor Justinian I dispatches a small Byzantine force (2,000 men) under Liberius to Hispania, according to the historian Jordanes. He conquers Cartagena and other cities on the southeastern coast.[8]
  • Justinian I receives the first silkworm eggs from two Nestorian monks at Constantinople. They were sent to Central Asia (see 550) and smuggle the precious eggs from China hidden in rods of bamboo.

Europe

Asia

By topic

Religion

553

By place

Byzantine Empire

Europe

  • Gothic War: Frankish invasion — Two Frankish-Alemanni dukes; the brothers Lothair and Buccelin, cross the Alps from Germany with a force of 75,000 men, mostly Frankish infantry. In the Po Valley, they win an easy victory over a much smaller Byzantine force at Parma, and are joined by remnants of the Gothic armies, bringing the total strength of the invaders to about 90,000 men. Narses, gathering his forces as quickly as possible, marched north to harass the Franks, but is not strong enough to engage them in battle. In Samnium (Southern Italy) the brothers divide their forces; Lothaire goes down the east coast, then returns to the north, to winter in the Po Valley. Buccelin follows the west coast to the very toe of the boot into Calabria, where he spent the winter — his army being seriously wasted by attrition and disease.

Asia

By topic

Religion


554

By place

Byzantine Empire

Europe

.

Persia

Asia

By topic

Religion

555

By place

Byzantine Empire

Europe

Britain

Persia

Asia

By topic

Arts and sciences

Religion

556

By place

Europe

Britain

Persia

By topic

Religion

557

By place

Europe

  • The Huns, the Avars are the former elite of a central Asian federation who has been forced to flee westwards.[18]

Asia

By topic

Religion

558

By place

Byzantine Empire

Europe

Asia

By topic

Religion

559

By place

Byzantine Empire

Britain

Asia

  • First successful human flight: a manned kite lands in the proximity of Ye, China. Emperor Wen Xuan Di sponsored the flight; Yuan Huangtou, a prisoner, is the unwilling aviator; other imprisoned kite flyers also fly, but those die and Yuan survives. Yuan is executed afterwards.[21]
  • Wen Di, age 37, succeeds his uncle Chen Wu Di as emperor of the Chen Dynasty. During his reign, he consolidates the state against the rebellious warlords.
  • The city-state Ara Gaya, a member of the Gaya confederacy, surrenders to Silla in the Korean peninsula.


Significant people

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ Imperial Chinese Armies (p. 23). C.J. Peers, 1995. ISBN 978-1-85532-514-2
  2. ^ J.Norwich, Byzantium: The Early Centuries, p. 251
  3. ^
  4. ^ Isidore of Seville, Historia de regibus Gothorum, Vandalorum et Suevorum, chapter 46. Translation by Guido Donini and Gordon B. Ford, Isidore of Seville's History of the Goths, Vandals, and Suevi, second revised edition (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1970), p. 22
  5. ^ Bury (1958), p. 116
  6. ^ Greatrex & Lieu (2002), p. 118-119
  7. ^ Rance, Philip. "Narses and the Battle of Taginae (Busta Gallorum)". Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte Vol. 54, No. 4 (2005), p. 424
  8. ^ Getica, p. 303
  9. ^
  10. ^ J. Norwich, Byzantium: The Early Centuries, p. 233
  11. ^ O'Donnell, "Liberius", p. 69
  12. ^ Cohen, Roger. "Return to Bamiyan", The New York Times, October 29, 2007. Accessed October 29, 2007.
  13. ^ Jean Leclerq, "The Love of Learning and the Desire for God", 2nd revised edition (New York: Fordham, Fordham University Press, (1977), p. 25
  14. ^ Martindale et al. p. 560, 841, 1103–1104; Bury & 1958 p. 118; Greatrex, Leu & 2002 p. 120–121
  15. ^ Myres, p. 162
  16. ^ Bury & 1958 p. 119; Martindale et al. p. 752, 845–846; Greatrex, Lieu & 2002 p. 121
  17. ^ Martindale, Jones & Morris (1992), p. 81–82
  18. ^ Rome at War (AD 293—696), p. 59. Michael Whitby, 2002. ISBN 1-84176-359-4
  19. ^
  20. ^ Litchi City Putian
  21. ^ (永定三年)使元黄头与诸囚自金凤台各乘纸鸱以飞,黄头独能至紫陌乃堕,仍付御史中丞毕义云饿杀之。 (Rendering: [In the 3rd year of Yongding, 559], Gao Yang conducted an experiment by having Yuan Huangtou and a few prisoners launch themselves from a tower in Ye, capital of the Northern Qi. Yuan Huangtou was the only one who survived from this flight, as he glided over the city-wall and fell at Zimo [western segment of Ye] safely, but he was later executed.) Zizhi Tongjian 167.
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