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Oxford English Dictionary

By: James A. H. Murray

According to the publishers, it would take a single person 120 years to 'key in' text to convert it to machine readable form which consists a total of 59 million words of the OED second edition, 60 years to proofread it, and 540 megabytes to store it electronically. As of 30 November 2005, the Oxford English Dictionary contained approximately 301,100 main entries. Supplementing the entry headwords, there are 157,000 bold-type combinations and derivatives; 169,000 itali...

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Information Technology Tales

By: Brad Bradford

This book also begins with that wondrous first Information Technology and then moves on to tales about the wonders of the written word—great stories, many of them likely new to most readers. In them, you‘ll find all the backgrounds, foregrounds, premises, conclusions, and surprises that make up the best and most valuable books.

In the Bible, God‘s first gift to man isn‘t a lesson about how to make a fire or fashion a needle, a knife, or a spear. He first blesses him with language. Even before He takes Adam‘s rib to make Eve, He tells Adam to name every living creature. Adam immediately understands God‘s words and enunciates his own.

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From the Mountains to the Sea-Early Hawaiian Life

By: Julie Stewart Williams

This book is one of a series originally written by faculty in a Kamehameha reading program. The books were designed to increase students' reading skills and their knowledge of Hawaiian history and culture by focusing on topics such as the Hawaiian monarchy. Some of these books have been translated from their original English into Hawaiian through the efforts of the staff of the Kamehameha Schools Hawaiian Studies Institute. We are pleased at the reception both the Eng...

Try to imagine Hawai’i five hundred years ago. What do you suppose life in the islands was like then? How do you think people survived? From the Mountains to the Sea: Early Hawaiian Life will help answer these questions. It will give us a glimpse of our early Hawaiian ancestors. We will see where they lived and how they lived. We will learn about their close ties to nature. By observing their relationship with this natural environment we will discover that these ea...

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Hawaiian Grammar

By: Samuel H. Elbert

The "Notes on Hawaiian Grammar" included in the first three editions of the Hawaiian-English Dictionary have in this volume been revised and expanded. The original notes were written during the early 1950s, and since that time the number of students of Polynesian languages has increased considerably, with resulting increase in knowledge of these languages. This new Grammar, therefore, presents an approach rather different from the previous one; however, it is not couch...

The English translations of illustrative sentences may in some instances seem awkward, but close translations are helpful to students. Not every possible translation of an illustrative sentence is given. For example, ia, meaning both 'he' and 'she', is usually translated 'he' to avoid the awkward 'he/she' and 'him/her'. Since Hawaiian is mainly tenseless and English is decidedly not, translations perforce included tense, but the alternative tenses are not given for ev...

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He Kuhikuhi O Ke Kanaka Hawaii (A Guide for Hawaiians)

By: J. W. H. Kauwahi

O ka agreement, oia ka Olelo Ae like, i hanaia a i hoo-holoia mawaena o na kanaka elua, a he lehulehu paha, no na mea a pau a laua, a o lakou paha i ae pu ai e hana. I ka manawa e palapala ai i olelo ae like mawaena o na aoao elua, he mea pono e hooopaa ia maloko o ka palapala na kumu nui, a me na mea a pau i ae like ia, a e kakau inoa ia hoi e na aoao elua nana ia olelo, a me na hoike pu no hoi; a nolaila i kapaia?i kela, he olelo ae like. O na kuinu manao, a ine na me...

He olelo ae like keia no ka hana ana a me ke kukulu ana i ka hale, i hanaia i keia la umi o Ianuari, M. H. hookahi tausani ewalu haneri a me kanalima kumamaono, mawaena o Lola Haleakala no Kapalama, Oahu, ma ka aoao mua, a me Laakea no Honolulu, Oahu, ma ka aoao elua, a eia na olelo a laua i ae like ai; o ka mea nona ka aoao elua i hoikeia maluna, ke hoopaa nei oia, a ke ae aku nei me ka mea nona ka aoao mua i oleloia maluna, e hana no oia, a e kapili pono, a e hana a pa...

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Ka Mooolelo No Ka Ekalesia O Iesu Kristo (History of the Church of...

By: H. Binamu

E ka Mea-heluhelu lokomaikai; aloha maikai oe. E nana maka oluolu mai i keia buke me he hoaaloha la. O keia Mooolelo Ekalesia, i kakau mua ia no ka La-hui-kanaka Hawaii, a i paiia hoi ma Lahainaluna, A. D. 1841, oia ka i hooponoponoia e ma ka makemake o "Ka Sosaieti Amerika Hoolaha Palapala" ka poe e pai mai-kai ana i keia Buke i unuhiia e ka nui mai loko ae o ka Mooolelo Ekalesia no na Kula a Kale A. Goderike i ka-kau ai. Ua hookomoia ka papa hou no "Na mea oloko." Ua...

I heluhelu pono ia o keia buke e oukou, e na hoahanau Hawaii, a me na kumu ao palapala, a me ka poe a pau e huli i ko loko, he pono paha ke hoakaka iki aku i kekahi mau mea no ke kakau ana. Eia ka mua: Na buke i heluheluia e ka mea nana i kakau i keia Mooolelo Ekalesia, i hiki ia ia ke unuhi pono ia iloko o ka olelo Hawaii:— (a) O ka Baibala ka mea nui e maopopo ai ke ano o ka ekalesia oiaio i na manawa a pau loa. Ma ke Kauoha Hou, ua ikeia ke kumu o ka Ekalesia Kerise...

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Life in Early Hawaii the Ahupuaa

By: Kamehameha Schools Press

The first edition of The Ahupuaa, published in 1979, was planned and developed by the Kamehameha Schools Hawaiian Studies Institute. It was the first publication undertaken by the institute, which was created in 1978 to consolidate the efforts of Hawaiian studies specialists from several Kamehameha programs. Kamehameha staff members Nuulani Atkins, Hooulu Cambra, Peter Galuteria, Donald D. Kilolani Mitchell, Gordon Piianaia, and Mahela Rosehill cooperated on research an...

In the time of umi, son of the great chief Liloa, the Hawaiian islands were divided into political regions. The four mokupuni (larger islands) of Kauai, Oahu, Maui, and Hawaii were divided into moku (districts). The smaller islands of Molokai, Lanai and Kahoolawe became moku of Maui and Niihau a moku of Kauai. For ease in collecting annual tribute the moku were subdivided into ahupuaa, land sections that usually extended from the mountain summits down through fertile val...

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Today's Take on Einstein's Relativity

By: Homer B. Titon and Florentin Smarandache

In a lecture that Einstein gave to the Prussian Academy of Sciences in 1921, he said the following: "Geometry predicates nothing about relations of real things, but only geometry together with the purport of physical laws can do so... The idea of the measuring rod and the idea of the clock contained with it in the theory of relativity do not find their exact correspondence in the real world. It is also clear that the solid body and the clock do not in the conceptual edif...

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Documents Relating to the Restoration of the Sandwich Islands Flag

By: Richard Thomas

This book contains a collection of documents relating to the restoration of the Sandwich Islands flag.

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Kamehameha and His Warrior Kekuhaupi'O

By: Samuel M. Kamakau

Beginning with the traditional history of the great chief ‘Umi and ending with the death of Kamehameha III in 1854, this volume covers the rediscovery of the Hawaiian Islands by Captain James Cook, the consolidation of the Hawaiian Kingdom by Kamehameha I, the coming of the missionaries and the changes affecting the kingdom during the first half of the nineteenth century. Originally, this history was written by Kamakau in Hawaiian as a series of newspaper articles in th...

The first article, dated December 16, 1920, was entitled “A Tale of Kekuhaupi‘o, the Famous Warrior of the Era of Kamehameha the Great (Written for the readers of Ka Hoku o Hawaii).” The serial initially focuses on the story of Kekuhaupi‘o, an exceptionally strong and skillful Hawaiian warrior from Ke‘ei, South Kona. As with most noted warriors, he was a master in the ways of battle strategy and in understanding human nature in his enemies and allies alike. Kekuhaupi‘o a...

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A’Ohe Inoa Komo ‘Ole O Ke ‘Ai

By: William H. Wilson

The internationally known ‘Aha Punana Leo, Inc. is a non-profit organization which was established in 1983 to revitalize the nearly extinct Hawaiian language and establish schools taught entirely through that language. The following year, the organization founded the first Punana Leo school which was also the first Native American language immersion school in the United States. After the Punana Leo families changed an 1896 law banning Hawaiian language schools, the Punan...

Kula Kaiapuni Hawai’i is usually a stream of classes within an English medium school. While children in the English medium classes often admire the ability to speak Hawaiian, they also sometimes tease Kula Kaiapuni Hawai’i students for being different. Although all children tease each other, being teased while in a minority position requires some positive support. This book was written in response to parents' requests for help in dealing with a true-life situation: the d...

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Aia I Hea

By: Eve Furchgott

Aha Punana LeoHe ahahui auhau ole ka Aha Punana Leo i ho okumu ia i ka makahiki 1983 no ka ho ola ana i ka olelo Hawai i a me ka ho okumu ana i na kula e a o ia i loko wale no o ia olelo. I ia makahiki aku, ua ku ke kula Punana Leo mua loa, ke kula ho olu u olelo oiwi mua loa ho i o Amelika Hui Pu la. Ma hope o ka ho ololi ia ana e ka ohana Punana Leo o kekahi kanawai o ka makahiki 1896 e papa ana i na kula olelo Hawai i, ua lawe ia ke ki ina ho ona aua...

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Ke Alo O Kona Mo'I (The Face of Her King)

By: Robert Lono'Ikuwa

Na Kamalei-He Papahana Ho‘ona‘auao Kamali‘i ia no loko mai o kekahi hui ku i ka ‘auhau ‘ole no ka ‘oiwi Hawai‘i. Aia kekahi i loko o keia ‘ahahui he polokalamu ho‘ona‘auao makua/kamali‘i no ka lawelawe ‘ana i na ‘ohana o Ko‘olauloa ma ka moku- puni o O‘ahu. Me ke kokua kala ‘ana o ka Administration for Native Americans no ka pahana Na Kama o Ko‘olauLoa, ha‘awi keia ‘ahahui i na ‘ohana i mau lawelawe ‘ohana a me na ha‘awina ho‘ona‘auao ho‘i no ka ulu maika‘i ‘ana ...

‘O na ‘ahahui kaiaulu o Ko‘olauloa me ko lakou mau haku puke ko makou mau kumu waiwai. Na lakou no i kako‘o i ka holomua ‘ana o ka heluhelu a me ke kakau ‘ana o na po‘e keiki ‘oiwi me ko lakou mau po‘e ‘ohana. Ua hana like pu makou ma ka haku ‘ana i keia mau puke a ka‘ana like pu makou i na mana‘o like ‘ole ma ke a‘o aku, a‘o mai. He kupaianaha keia mau puke, no ka mea, na makou, na kupa o Ko’olauloa i ha‘i i keia mau mo‘olelo. Ua pa‘i ‘ia akula kela puke keia...

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Moloka'I: Where I Live

By: Julie Stewart Williams

Ahupuaa is a section of land most often running from the mountains to the sea. Within most ahupuaa were three areas: uka (upland), kula (plains and fields), and kai (sea and nearby land). These areas contained almost everything people needed to survive. Two words are in the word“ahupuaa:” “ahu” for altar and “puaa” for pig. An altar of stones was built on the ahupuaa boundary in honor of the god Lono. Lono was the god of peace, rain, clouds, winds, the sea, agr...

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Stories of Life in Old Hawaii

By: Caroline Curtis

Writing in the nineteenth century, Hawaiian historian Kepelino said, "However diligently the foreigner seeks, he cannot find all. He gets a fragment here and there and goes home." That is very true. I have read what is available, but changes came so rapidly after 1778 that much of the information about the life and customs of long-ago Hawaii is lost. My greatest help has come from Mary Kawena Pukui. As a little girl in Kau, on the island of Hawaii, she lived with a wise...

Hawaiian words used in the text, other than proper names, are identified through the use of italic type. These words are usually defined in the sentence in which they are first used or in the Glossary at the back of the book or both. Most Hawaiian words, like most words in English and other languages, can have more than one meaning depending on how and where they are used. Many Hawaiian words form plurals through the use of preceding articles or by changes in the diacr...

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The Power of Our Words

By: Liz Mcgrath

Do you know that an empowering word can spark ideas, open doors, change attitudes, and create solutions? Words can do all these things and much more. They have the potency to redefine personalities, lives, and entire communities. Just think of some of the things words are used for every day: To communicate a message To express a feeling To interact with others To associate meaning, intention, and tone To record history To tell stories And so much more! When used the righ...

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The Future of the Internet : And How to Stop It

By: Jonathan Zittrain

This extraordinary book explains the engine that has catapulted the Internet from backwater to ubiquity?and reveals that it is sputtering precisely because of its runaway success. With the unwitting help of its users, the generative Internet is on a path to a lockdown, ending its cycle of innovation?and facilitating unsettling new kinds of control. (futureoftheinternet.org)

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Family and More : Enemies or Friends?

By: Helena Harper

Who influences us in our lives? How do they influence us? Whom do we call an enemy? Whom do we call a friend? And why? Why do we have relationships at all? These are the questions Helena Harper eloquently asks in her collection of poems that examines the relationships in her own life. She has had to rethink her definition of 'enemy', not least because her father was English and her mother German and they met in the aftermath of World War II in Germany. She has also been ...

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The Marketing of Ideas and Social Issues

By: Seymour Fine

An idea is taken for granted in the scheme of things. Someone exclaims, "I've got an idea!" What is it that he has? From where did he get it? How was it transmitted? How might it spread to others? What will be the effect of the acceptance of the idea? These are some of the questions dealt with in this book. In this first chapter the nature of an idea is developed, contextualized and shown to be a most timely topic. To pave the way for this book's argument that ideas are ...

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The Public Domain : Enclosing the Commons of the Mind

By: James Boyle

Our music, our culture, our science, and our economic welfare all depend on a delicate balance between those ideas that are controlled and those that are free, between intellectual property and the public domain. In The Public Domain: Enclosing the Commons of the Mind (Yale University Press) James Boyle introduces readers to the idea of the public domain and describes how it is being tragically eroded by our current copyright, patent, and trademark laws. In a series of f...

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