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Sham el-Nessim

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Title: Sham el-Nessim  
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Subject: Public holidays in Egypt, Fesikh, Sham, Season of the Harvest, Egyptian culture
Collection: Egyptian Culture, Moveable Holidays (Easter Date Based), Public Holidays in Egypt, Spring Holidays
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Sham el-Nessim

Sham Ennisim
Official name Egyptian Arabic: شم النسيم Shamm en-Nisīm
Observed by Egyptians
Type Cultural, seasonal, and agricultural
Celebrations Visiting parks and zoos, going on picnics, eating certain foods (Salted and smoked Herrings, Fermented fish "Fesikh"), coloring and eating eggs
Date day after the Eastern Christian Easter
Frequency annual
Related to Easter (Eastern)

Sham ennisim (Egyptian Arabic: شم النسيم, IPA: , from Coptic: Ϭⲱⲙ ̀ⲛⲛⲓⲥⲓⲙ shom ennisim) is an Egyptian national holiday marking the beginning of spring. It always falls on the day after the Eastern Christian Easter (following the custom of the largest Christian denomination in the country, the Coptic Orthodox Church). Despite the Christian-related date, the holiday is celebrated by Egyptians regardless of religion.[1]

The name of the holiday is derived from the Egyptian name of the Harvest Season, known as Shemu, which means a day of creation. According to annals written by Plutarch during the 1st century AD, the Ancient Egyptians used to offer salted fish, lettuce, and onions to their deities on this day.[2]

After the Christianization of Egypt, the festival became associated with the other Christian spring festival, Easter. Over time, Shemu morphed into its current form and its current date, and by the time of the Islamic conquest of Egypt, the holiday was settled on Easter Monday. The Islamic calendar being lunar and thus unfixed relative to the solar year, the date of Sham el-Nessim remained on the Christian-linked date even after most Egyptians had become Muslims. As Egypt became Arabized, the term Shemu found a rough phono-semantic match in Sham el-Nessim, or "Smelling/Taking In of the Zephyrs," which fairly accurately represents the way in which Egyptians celebrate the holiday.

In his book, Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians, Edward William Lane wrote in 1834:

A custom termed 'Shemm en-Nessem' (or the Smelling of the Zephyr) is observed on the first day of the Khamaseen. Early in the morning of this day, many persons, especially women, break an onion, and smell it; and in the course of the forenoon many of the citizens of Cairo ride or walk a little way into the country, or go in boats, generally northward, to take the air, or, as they term it, smell the air, which on that day they believe to have a wonderfully beneficial effect. The greater number dine in the country or on the river. This year they were treated with a violent hot wind, accompanied by clouds of dust, instead of the neseem; but considerable numbers, notwithstanding, went out to 'smell' it.

The modern Sham ennisim is celebrated by both Christians and Muslims, so it is considered a national festival, rather than a religious one. The main features of the festival are:

See also

References

  1. ^ Al Ahram Weekly
  2. ^ Al Ahram Weekly
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