World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Pope Paul V

Pope
Paul V
Pope Paul V by Caravaggio.
Papacy began 16 May 1605
Papacy ended 28 January 1621
Predecessor Leo XI
Successor Gregory XV
Orders
Consecration 27 May 1597
by Clement VIII
Created Cardinal 5 June 1596
by Clement VIII
Personal details
Birth name Camillo Borghese
Born (1552-09-17)17 September 1552
Rome, Papal States
Died 28 January 1621(1621-01-28) (aged 68)
Rome, Papal States
Previous post
Motto Absit nisi in te gloriari (Far, but in your glory)[1]
Other popes named Paul

Pope Paul V (Pope from 16 May 1605 to his death in 1621.

Contents

  • Early life 1
  • Cardinal 2
  • Papacy 3
    • Election 3.1
    • Theology 3.2
    • Canonisations and Beatifications 3.3
    • Foreign relations 3.4
      • Ecclesiastical jurisdiction 3.4.1
      • Relations with England 3.4.2
      • Relations with Japan 3.4.3
    • Constructions 3.5
    • Death 3.6
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Early life

He was born on 17 September 1552 into the noble Siena which had recently fled to Rome, and ROMANUS appears in most of his inscriptions. He began his career as a lawyer educated at Perugia and then in Padua.[2]

Cardinal

In June 1596 he was made Cardinal-Priest of Sant'Eusebio and Cardinal Vicar of Rome[2] by Pope Clement VIII, and had as secretary Niccolò Alamanni. During this time, he opted for other titular churches like San Crisogno and Santi Giovanni e Paolo.

Papacy

Election

When Caesar Baronius and Roberto Cardinal Bellarmine; his neutrality in the factional times made him an ideal compromise candidate. In character he was very stern and unyielding, a lawyer rather than diplomat, who defended the privileges of the Church to his utmost. His first act was to send home to their sees the bishops who were sojourning in Rome, for the Council of Trent had insisted that every bishop reside in his diocese.[2] Soon after his accession as Pope Paul V, Borghese determined to humiliate Venice, as his predecessor had done, for attempting to preserve its independence from the papacy in the administration of its government.

Papal styles of
Pope Paul V
Reference style His Holiness
Spoken style Your Holiness
Religious style Holy Father
Posthumous style None

Theology

Paul met with Galileo Galilei in 1616 after Cardinal Bellarmine had, on his orders, warned Galileo not to hold or defend the heliocentric ideas of Copernicus. Whether there was also an order not to teach those ideas in any way has been a matter for controversy. A letter from Bellarmine to Galileo, however, states only the injunction that the heliocentric ideas could not be defended or held; this letter was written expressly to enable Galileo to defend himself against rumors concerning what had happened in the meeting with Bellarmine.

Canonisations and Beatifications

He canonised Charles Borromeo (1 November 1610) and Frances of Rome. He beatified a number of individuals, including Ignatius Loyola, Philip Neri, Theresa of Avila, and Francis Xavier.

Foreign relations

Mosaic depicting the arms of Pope Paulus V (Camillo Borghese).

Ecclesiastical jurisdiction

Paul's insistence of ecclesiastical jurisdiction led to a number of quarrels between the Church and the secular governments of various states, notably Venice, where patricians, such as Ermolao Barbaro (1548–1622) of the noble Barbaro family, argued in favor of the exemption of the clergy from the jurisdiction of the civil courts. Venice passed two laws obnoxious to Paul, one forbidding the alienation of real estate in favour of the clergy, the second demanding approval of the civil power for the building of new churches (in essence, a Venetian stance that the powers of the church must remain separate from those of the state). Two priests charged by the Venetian state with cruelty, wholesale poisoning, murder and licentiousness, were arrested by the Senate and put in dungeons for trial. Having been found guilty, they were committed to prison.

Paul V insisted that they be released to the Church. He demanded the release of the priests as not being amenable to the secular law. When this was refused, the Pope threatened an interdict on account of the property laws and the imprisonment of ecclesiastics, which threat was presented to the Senate on Christmas 1605. The Venetian position was ably defended by a canon lawyer, Paolo Sarpi, who extended the matter to general principles defining separate secular and ecclesiastical spheres. In April 1606 the Pope excommunicated the entire government of Venice and placed an interdict on the city. Father Sarpi strongly advised the Venetian government to refuse to receive the Pope's interdict, and to reason with him while opposing force by force. The Venetian Senate willingly accepted this advice and Fra Paolo presented the case to Paul V, urging from history that the Pope's claim to intermeddle in civil matters was a usurpation; and that in these matters the Republic of Venice recognized no authority but that of God. The rest of the Catholic clergy sided with the city, with the exception of the Jesuits, the Theatines, and the Capuchins. The dissenting clergy were forthwith expelled from Venetian territories. Masses continued to be said in Venice, and the feast of Corpus Christi was celebrated with displays of public pomp and "magnificence", in defiance of the Pope. Within a year (March 1607) the disagreement was mediated by France and Spain. The Most Serene Republic refused to retract the laws, but asserted that Venice would conduct herself "with her accustomed piety." The Jesuits, which Venice considered subversive Papal agents, remained banned. No more could be expected. Paul withdrew his censure.

The Venetian Republic rewarded Fra Paulo Sarpi, its successful canon lawyer, with the distinction of state counsellor in jurisprudence and the liberty of access to the state archives, which infuriated Pope Paul. In September 1607, after unsuccessfully attempting to lure Father Sarpi to Rome, the Pope responded by putting out a contract on his life.[3][4] Father Sarpi was the target of at least two assassination plots in September and October.[3] Stabbed fifteen times with a stiletto, Fra Sarpi somehow managed to recover, while the assassins found refuge in the Papal territories.[3]

Relations with England

Paul V's hard-edged Catholic diplomacy cut the ground from under moderate

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Leo XI
Pope
16 May 1605 – 28 January 1621
Succeeded by
Gregory XV
  •  

External links

  • James I, De Triplici Nodo, Triplex Cuneus, (his anonymous pamphlet encouraging loyalty to the Crown, accompanied by letters from Paul V about the Catholic Church's opinion of the Oath of Allegiance, and James' responses to them).
  • Stephen A. Coston, King James VI & I and Papal Opposition, 1998.

References

  1. ^ "Pope Alexander VII (1655-1667)". GCatholic. Retrieved 10 May 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c Loughlin, James. "Pope Paul V." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 11. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. 3 Sept. 2014
  3. ^ a b c Robertson, Alexander, Fra Paolo Sarpi: the Greatest of the Venetians, London: Sampson, Low, Marston & Co. (1893), pp. 114–117
  4. ^ Watson, J. Henry, The History of Fra Paolo Sarpi, New York: La Croce (1911)
  5. ^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Hasekura Tsunenaga" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 412.

Notes

See also

Paul V died on 28 January 1621 of a stroke in the Quirinal Palace and was succeeded as pope by Pope Gregory XV.

Death

Paul V also established the Bank of the Holy Spirit in 1605.

In Rome, the pope financed the completion of Scipione Borghese wielded enormous power on his behalf, consolidating the rise of the Borghese family.

Constructions

Painting of Emanuele Ne Vunda, ambassador from Alvaro II to Pope Paul V in 1604–1608, Sala dei Corazzieri, Palazzo del Quirinale, Rome, 1615–1616.

Hasekura gave the Pope a letter (from Date Masamune) which requested a trade treaty between Japan and New Spain. The letter also asked for Christian missionaries to be sent to Japan. The Pope agreed to the dispatch of missionaries, but left the decision for trade to the King of Spain.

In November 1615, Paul V welcomed the embassy of the Japanese samurai Hasekura Tsunenaga in Rome.[5]

Pope Paul V welcoming the embassy of the Japanese samurai Hasekura Tsunenaga in Rome in 1615.
Japanese painting, 17th century.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.