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Orisha

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Title: Orisha  
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Subject: Yoruba religion, Umbanda, Candomblé, Obatala, Afro-American religion
Collection: Afro-American Religion, Orisha, Yoruba Culture, Yoruba Religion, Yoruba Words and Phrases
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Orisha

An orisha (spelled orichá or orixá in Latin America) is a spirit that reflects one of the manifestations of God (Eledumare, Olorun, Olofi) in Yoruba religion. There are a total of 401 orishas. Many orishas have found their way throughout the New World via the Atlantic slave trade and are now expressed in practices as varied as Santería, Candomblé, Trinidad Orisha, and Oyotunji, among others.[1]

Contents

  • Beliefs 1
  • Pantheon 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5
  • External links 6

Beliefs

Practitioners traditionally believe that daily life depends on proper alignment and knowledge of one's ori. Ori literally means the head, but in spiritual matters it is taken to mean a portion of the soul that determines personal destiny and success. Ashe is the life-force that runs through all things, living and inanimate. Ashe is the power to make things happen. It is an affirmation which is used in greetings and prayers, as well as a concept of spiritual growth. Orisha devotees strive to obtain Ashe through iwa-pele or gentle and good character, and in turn they experience alignment with the ori, what others might call inner peace and satisfaction with life. Ashe is divine energy that comes from Olodumare, the Creator and is manifested through Olorun, who rules the heavens and is associated with the sun. Without the sun, no life could exist, just as life cannot exist without some degree of ashe. Ashe is sometimes associated with Eshu, the messenger Orisha.[2] For practitioners, ashe represents a link to the eternal presence of God, the Orishas, and the ancestors.[3]

The concept is regularly referenced in Brazilian capoeira. "Axé" in this context is used as a greeting or farewell, in songs and as a form of praise. Saying that someone 'has axé' in capoeira is complimenting their energy, fighting spirit, and attitude.

Pantheon

See also

References

  1. ^ Kevin Baxter (on De La Torre), Ozzie Guillen secure in his faith, Los Angeles Times, 2007
  2. ^ Robert D. Pelton (1989). The Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Irony and Sacred Delight. University of California Press.  
  3. ^ Cynthia Duncan, Ph.D., About santeria

Further reading

  • Awo Fa'Lokun Fatunmbi Orisas
  • J. Omosade Awolalu, Yoruba Beliefs & Sacrificial Rites. ISBN 0-9638787-3-5
  • William Bascom, Sixteen Cowries.
  • Lydia Cabrera, El Monte: Igbo-Nfinda, Ewe Orisha/Vititi Nfinda. ISBN 0-89729-009-7
  • Raul Canizares, Cuban Santeria.
  • Chief Priest Ifayemi Elebuibon, Apetebii: The Wife of Orunmila. ISBN 0-9638787-1-9
  • Fakayode Fayemi Fatunde (2004) Osun, The Manly Woman. New York: Athelia Henrietta Press.
  • James T. Houk, Spirits, Blood, and Drums: The Orisha Religion of Trinidad. 1995. Temple University Press.
  • Jo Anna Hunter, "Oro Pataki Aganju: A Cross Cultural Approach Towards the Understanding of the Fundamentos of the Orisa Aganju in Nigeria and Cuba". In Orisa Yoruba God and Spiritual Identity in Africa and the Diaspora, edited by Toyin Falola, Ann Genova. New Jersey: Africa World Press, Inc. 2006.
  • Baba Ifa Karade, The Handbook of Yoruba Religious Concepts, Weiser Books, York Beach, New York, 1994. ISBN 0-87728-789-9
  • Gary Edwards (Author), John Mason (Author), Black Gods - Orisa Studies in the New World, 1998. ISBN 1-881244-08-3
  • John Mason, Olokun: Owner of Rivers and Seas. ISBN 1-881244-05-9
  • John Mason, Orin Orisa: Songs for selected Heads. ISBN 1-881244-06-7
  • David M. O'Brien, Animal Sacrifice and Religious Freedom: Church of the Lukumi Babalu Aye v. City of Hialeah.
  • S. Solagbade Popoola, Ikunle Abiyamo: It is on Bent Knees that I gave Birth. 2007. Asefin Media Publication
  • Robert Farris Thompson, Flash of the Spirit.
  • Robert D Pelton, The Trickster in West Africa chapters on Eshu and Legba. 1989. University of California Press
  • J Lorand Matory, Black Atlantic Religion. 2009. Princeton University Press

External links

  • Santeria.fr :: All in One for Orishas
  • Santeria.fr :: Todo sobre Orishas
  • Santeria.fr :: Tout sur les Orishas
  • Discover more about Orisha in Bahia - Brazil
  • Los-Orishas
  • Oyeku Ofun Temple - A peaceful place for Divine worship
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