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Christopher B. "Stubb" Stubblefield

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Christopher B. "Stubb" Stubblefield

Christopher B. "Stubb" Stubblefield
Born Christopher B. Stubblefield, Sr.
(1931-03-07)March 7, 1931
Navasota, Texas, U.S.
Died May 27, 1995(1995-05-27) (aged 64)
Nationality American
Other names Stubb
Occupation Restaurateur

Christopher B. "Stubb" Stubblefield, Sr. (March 7, 1931 – May 27, 1995) was an American barbecue restaurateur and music patron known for his barbecue sauces, rubs, and marinades distributed nationally by Stubb’s Legendary Kitchen, Inc.

Early life and career

Born in Navasota, Texas, Stubblefield was one of 12 children, 9 boys and 3 girls. His family moved to Lubbock in the 1930s where his father was a minister and sharecropper. Stubblefield was employed in his youth as a cotton picker. He later served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War where after being injured he moved to the mess hall where he prepared meals for soldiers. After he left the Army, Stubblefield moved back to Lubbock, TX.

Restaurateur

In Lubbock, Stubblefield found a mentor in barbecue restaurateur Amos Gamel. It was from Gamel that Stubblefield learned the art of smoking meats and complimenting barbecue with sauce.

In 1968, he opened his first restaurant, “Stubb's Bar-B-Q” on East Broadway in Lubbock. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the Sunday Night Jams held in his small restaurant hosted such musicians as Jessie "Guitar" Taylor, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Joe Ely, Terry Allen, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Muddy Waters, Tom T. Hall, B. B. King and George Thorogood.

Stubb's restaurant closed in the early 80’s. The building was demolished and never rebuilt. He relocated to Austin and in 1984 began selling barbecue at the blues joint Antone’s. He later set up his own restaurant off Highway 35 in Austin which closed down in the late 80’s.

In 1990, Stubblefield set up Stubb’s Legendary Kitchen with partners to sell barbecue sauce at grocery stores. The company survived his death in 1995 and continues to sell his Original and Spicy barbecue sauce as well as marinades, rubs and other barbecue sauce flavors nationwide.


Stubb died in Austin in 1995 of congestive heart failure. A memorial to Stubblefield was realized in 1999 when a bronze statue by his friend Terry Allen was dedicated on the site of his first restaurant. Stubblefield is depicted holding a platter of barbecue in one hand with his other hand open welcoming patrons to his restaurant. There are small plaques set into what remains of the floor of the restaurant showing the locations of the kitchen, cash register, restrooms, etc.

A year after his death, Stubb's restaurant reopened at 801 Red River in Austin as a restaurant and live music venue. It has hosted musicians James Brown, Foo Fighters, Willie Nelson, REM, Snoop Dogg, Ween and Metallica along with many others.

Death and legacy

Stubblefield died of congestive heart failure on May 27, 1995.[1] In 2009, Stubblefield was inducted into the Austin Music Memorial.[2]

Notes

References

  • Lubbock pays tribute to Stubb - from Lubbockonline.com
  • Ely to perform musical tribute at Stubb's statue - from Lubbockonline.com

External links

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