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New Zealand women's national rugby union team

New Zealand
Union New Zealand Rugby Union
Nickname(s) Black Ferns
Coach(es) Glenn Moore
Captain(s) Fiao’o Fa’amausili
Most caps Anna Richards
Top scorer Anna Richards (89)
First international
 New Zealand 56 - 0 Netherlands 
(Christchurch, New Zealand; August 26, 1990)
Largest win
 New Zealand 134 - 6 Germany 
(Amsterdam, Netherlands; May 2, 1998)
Largest defeat
 England 21 - 7 New Zealand 
(Esher, England; November 29, 2011)
World Cup
Appearances 6 (First in 1991)
Best result Champions 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010

The New Zealand national women's rugby union team, officially nicknamed the Black Ferns, represents New Zealand in women's rugby union, which is regarded as the country's national sport.[1]

Contents

  • Team's name 1
  • History 2
  • Current Squad 3
    • Previous Squads 3.1
  • Results 4
    • Summary 4.1
    • Full internationals 4.2
    • Other internationals 4.3
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Team's name

The team's nickname combines the colour black and the silver fern, which are iconic New Zealand sporting symbols. For example, the All Blacks is New Zealand's famous men's rugby team, the Black Caps is the men's cricket team, the White Ferns is the women's cricket team, while the Silver Ferns is the national women's netball team.

History

They won four consecutive World Cups before losing in the 2014 final, winning the first International Rugby Board (IRB)-sponsored Cup in 1998, the 2002 World Cup in Barcelona, the 2006 World Cup in Edmonton, Canada, and the 2010 World Cup in London, England. The Black Ferns have participated in most WRWC events since its inauguration in 1991, only missing the 1994 championship in Scotland. They also won the Canada Cup in 1996, 2000, and 2005, and the Churchill Cup in 2004.

Farah Palmer, who had been captain since 1997, lost her captaincy in 2005 due to a shoulder injury. However, she was honoured as International Women's (Rugby) Personality of the Year at the IRB Awards. During that year, Rochelle Martin and Anna Richards led the team in the 2005 test series against England, which the Black Ferns won 2-0. For the 5th Women's Rugby World Cup in Canada, Farah Palmer fought her way back into the Black Ferns team. After again leading the team to World Cup victory, Palmer announced her retirement from the Black Ferns in September 2006.[2]

While rugby is the most popular spectator game in New Zealand, the Black Ferns have suffered in the past from similar problems to any women's sport—under-funding, lack of support and lack of publicity. The Verusco Technologies TryMaker video analysis system, as used by the All Blacks. In more recent times, the team's profile has risen greatly at a grassroots level, due in great part to their string of successes, and it is increasingly seen to be a national team on the same basis as any other.

In January 2010 NZRU announced that the National Provincial Competition (NPC) will have to go due to budget cuts. This has been a shock for many women players especially since it is a World Cup year. Former captain Farah Palmer was one of the women who commented on that.[3] NZRU said women's domestic rugby is one of many victims of the tight financial times. They have faced a barrage of criticism for their decision. General manager of provincial rugby Neil Sorenson said NZRU is going to replace the competition with camps and trials for the Black Ferns.

After the Black Ferns won the World Cup in 2010 and due to efforts of many rugby players in New Zealand the NPC was re-installed. The Auckland Storm with Emma Jensen captaining the side, won the final against Canterbury 38-12 in Christchurch. It was the Auckland Storm 5th consecutive title.

Current Squad

Squad for the 2015 Women's Rugby Super Series in Canada:[4]

Sosoli Talawadua replaced Sita Kuruyabaki due to visa delays. Lesley Ketu replaced Rebekah Tufuga-Cordero due to injury.

Forwards

  • Toka Natua (Waikato)
  • Fiao'o Fa'amausili (c) (Auckland)
  • Aleisha Nelson (Auckland)
  • Eloise Blackwell (Auckland)
  • Charmaine Smith (North Harbour)
  • Charlene Halapua (Auckland)
  • Justine Lavea (Counties Manukau)
  • Linda Itunu (Auckland)
  • Aldora Itunu (Auckland)
  • Sosoli Talawadua (Waikato)
  • Teresa Te Tamaki (Waikato)
  • Lesley Ketu (Waikato)
  • Te Kura Ngata-Aerengamate (Counties Manukau)
  • Angie Sisifa (Otago)

Backs

  • Kendra Cocksedge (Canterbury)
  • Victoria Subritzky-Nafatali (Counties Manukau)
  • Chelsea Alley (North Harbour)
  • Stacey Waaka (Waikato)
  • Keri Hayden (Manawatu)
  • Honey Hireme (Waikato)
  • Selica Winiata (Manawatu)
  • Renee Wickcliffe (Counties Manukau)
  • Kiritapu Demant (Auckland)
  • Emma Jensen (Auckland)
  • Arihana Marino (Counties Manukau)
  • Janna Vaughan (Manawatu)

Previous Squads

Results

The first four games listed below - played at RugbyFest 1990 - are not generally accepted as being internationals by New Zealand authorities. However, in men's rugby it is general practice to award full international status to any games where ONE side considers a game to be an international. As a result all games in that tournament have been treated as full internationals in this article.

Summary

(Full internationals only)
Rugby: New Zealand internationals 1990-
Opponent First game Played Won Drawn Lost Percentage
 Australia 1994 12 12 0 0 100.00%
 Canada 1991 10 10 0 0 100.00%
 England 1997 22 14 1 7 65.91%
 Spain 1998 1 1 0 0 100.00%
 France 1996 4 4 0 0 100.00%
 Germany 1998 2 2 0 0 100.00%
 Ireland 2014 1 0 0 1 0.00%
 Netherlands 1990 1 1 0 0 100.00%
 Samoa 2006 2 2 0 0 100.00%
 Scotland 1998 3 3 0 0 100.00%
 South Africa 2010 1 1 0 0 100.00%
 Soviet Union 1990 1 1 0 0 100.00%
 United States 1990 7 6 0 1 85.71%
 Wales 1991 2 2 0 0 100.00%
  World XV 1990 3 3 0 0 100.00%
Summary 1990 71 62 1 8 88.03%

Full internationals

See Women's international rugby for information about the status of international games and match numbering.

[39]
1990-08-26(RF) New Zealand  56–0  Netherlands Christchurch [1/17/1]
[40]
1990-08-28(RF) New Zealand  8–0  Soviet Union Christchurch [2/1/1]
[43]
1990-08-30(RF) New Zealand  9–3  United States Christchurch [3/5/1]
[45]
1990-09-01(RF) New Zealand  12–4   World XV Christchurch [4/1/1]
[47]
1991-04-06 (WC) New Zealand  24-8  Canada Glamorgan Wanderers [5/4/1]
[55]
1991-04-10 (WC) Wales  6-24  New Zealand Llanharan [8/6/1]
[59]
1991-04-12 (WC) New Zealand  0-7  United States Cardiff Arms Park [7/9/2]
[110]
1994-09-02 Australia  0-37  New Zealand Sydney [1/8/1]
[123]
1995-07-22 New Zealand  64-0  Australia Auckland [9/2/2]
[140]
1996-08-31 Australia  5-28  New Zealand Sydney [3/10/3]
[141]
1996-09-08 (CC) Canada  3-88  New Zealand Edmonton [15/11/2]
[143]
1996-09-11 (CC) New Zealand  88-8  United States Edmonton [12/20/3]
[145]
1996-09-14 (CC) France  0-109  New Zealand Edmonton [38/13/1]
[171]
1997-08-13 New Zealand  67-0  England Burnham [14/36/1]
[172]
1997-08-16 New Zealand  44-0  Australia Dunedin [15/5/4]
[194]
1998-05-02 (WC) Germany  6-134  New Zealand Amsterdam [19/16/1]
[202]
1998-05-05 (WC) New Zealand  76-0  Scotland Amsterdam [17/30/1]
[209]
1998-05-09 (WC) New Zealand  46-3  Spain Amsterdam [18/17/1]
[214]
1998-05-12 (WC) England  11-44  New Zealand Amsterdam [46/19/2]
[229]
1998-05-16 (WC) New Zealand  44-12  United States Amsterdam [20/29/4]
[230]
1998-08-29 Australia  3-27  New Zealand Sydney [11/21/5]
[258]
1999-10-16 (T99) New Zealand  73-0  Canada Palmerston North, New Zealand [22/26/3]
[259]
1999-10-19 (T99) New Zealand  65-5  United States Palmerston North, New Zealand [23/32/5]
[291]
2000-09-23 (CC) Canada  0-41  New Zealand Winnipeg [28/24/4]
[292]
2000-09-27 (CC) New Zealand  45-0  United States Winnipeg [25/35/6]
[294]
2000-09-30 (CC) England  13-32  New Zealand Winnipeg [65/26/3]
[332]
2001-06-09 New Zealand  15-10  England Rotorua [27/76/4]
[333]
2001-06-16 New Zealand  17-22  England North Harbour Stadium, Albany [28/77/5]
[362]
2002-05-13 (WC) Germany  0-117  New Zealand Barcelona [35/29/2]
[371]
2002-05-18 (WC) Australia  3-36  New Zealand Barcelona [15/30/6]
[384]
2002-05-21 (WC) New Zealand  30-0  France Barcelona [31/78/2]
[393]
2002-05-25 (WC) England  9-19  New Zealand Barcelona [85/32/6]
[424]
2003-10-04 New Zealand  37-0   World XV Eden Park, Auckland [33/2/2]
[425]
2003-10-11 New Zealand  38-18   World XV Whangarei [34/3/3]
[464]
2004-06-08 (CC) Canada  5-32  New Zealand Thunderbird Stadium, Vancouver [43/35/5]
[465]
2004-06-13 (CC) New Zealand  35-0  United States Calgary Rugby Park [36/48/7]
[468]
2004-06-19 (CC) England  0-38  New Zealand Edmonton [104/37/7]
[508]
2005-06-29 (CC) New Zealand  30-9  Scotland Ottawa [39/88/2]
[510]
2005-07-05 (CC) Canada  3-43  New Zealand Ottawa [49/39/6]
[511]
2005-07-08 (CC) Canada  5-32  New Zealand Ottawa [50/40/7]
[513]
2005-10-22 New Zealand  24-15  England Eden Park, Auckland [41/114/8]
[515]
2005-10-26 New Zealand  33-8  England Waikato Stadium, Hamilton [42/115/9]
[559]
2006-08-31 (WC) New Zealand  66-7  Canada Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [56/43/8]
[565]
2006-09-04 (WC) New Zealand  50-0  Samoa St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [44/10/1]
[571]
2006-09-08 (WC) New Zealand  21-0  Scotland Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [45/98/3]
[577]
2006-09-12 (WC) New Zealand  40-10  France Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [46/110/3]
[588]
2006-09-17 (WC) England  17-25  New Zealand Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton [124/47/10]
[645]
2007-10-16 New Zealand  21-10  Australia Cooks Gardens, Wanganui [48/23/7]
[646]
2007-10-20 New Zealand  29-12  Australia Wellington [49/24/8]
[717]
2008-07-22 Australia  3-37  New Zealand Canberra [25/50/9]
[718]
2008-07-26 Australia  16-22  New Zealand Sydney [26/51/10]
[777]
2009-11-14 England  3-16  New Zealand Esher [151/52/11]
[780]
2009-11-21 England  10-3  New Zealand Twickenham [152/53/12]
[837]
2010-08-20 (WC) New Zealand  55-3  South Africa Surrey Sports Park, Guildford [54/20/1]
[844]
2010-08-24 (WC) Australia  5-32  New Zealand Surrey Sports Park, Guildford [29/55/11]
[848]
2010-08-28 (WC) New Zealand  41–8  Wales Surrey Sports Park, Guildford [56/134/2]
[857]
2010-09-01 (WC) New Zealand  45–7  France Twickenham Stoop [149/57/4]
[858]
2010-09-05 (WC) England  10-13  New Zealand Twickenham Stoop [168/58/13]
[917]
2011-11-26 England  10-0  New Zealand Twickenham, London [179/59/14]
[918]
2011-11-29 England  21-7  New Zealand Esher [180/60/15]
[919]
2011-12-03 England  8-8  New Zealand Esher [181/61/16]
[961]
2012-11-23 England  16-13  New Zealand Esher [191/62/17]
[963]
2012-11-27 England  17-8  New Zealand Aldershot Military Stadium [192/63/18]
[964]
2012-12-01 England  32-23  New Zealand Twickenham [193/64/19]
[1000]
2013-07-13 New Zealand  29-10  England [65/199/20]
[1001]
2013-07-16 New Zealand  14-9  England Waikato Stadium, Hamilton [66/200/21]
[1002]
2013-07-20 New Zealand  29-8  England ECOlight Stadium, Pukekohe [67/201/22]
[1046]
2014-06-01 New Zealand  38-3  Australia Rotorua International Stadium, Rotorua, New Zealand [68/32/13]
[1048]
2014-06-10 New Zealand  90-12  Samoa Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand [69/18/2]
[1049]
2014-06-10 New Zealand  16-8  Canada Tauranga, New Zealand [70/102/9]
[1050]
2014-06-14 New Zealand  33-21  Canada Whakatane, New Zealand [71/103/10]

Other internationals

[-]
2009-11-17 England A  3-48  New Zealand Esher [-/-/-]

See also

Women's international rugby - the most complete listing of all women's international results since 1982.

References

  1. ^ "Sport, Fitness and Leisure". New Zealand Official Yearbook. Statistics New Zealand. 2000. Retrieved 21 July 2008. Traditionally New Zealanders have excelled in rugby union, which is regarded as the national sport, and track and field athletics. 
  2. ^ Farah Palmer announces retirement
  3. ^ Cleaver, Dylan (23 January 2010). "'"Rugby: NZRU plan 'will kill women's rugby.  
  4. ^ James Mortimer (26 June 2015). "Black Ferns set to kick off in Women’s Super Series". Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  5. ^ IRB (2014). "New Zealand Squad". Retrieved 26 August 2014. 

External links

  • Black Ferns team page at AllBlacks.com
  • 2006 Women's Rugby World Cup
  • a fan site about New Zealand Women's Rugby
  • Verusco, the Black Ferns video analysis system provider
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