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Logical consequence (X) Philosophy (X)

       
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The Gorgias

By: Jowett, Benjamin, 1817-1893

...Pericles, but in a higher one; and this will sooner or later entail the same consequences on him. He cannot be a private man if he would; neither can ... ...ato s Gorgias to do what is right, without reference to public opinion or to consequences. And we regard them as happy on this ground only, much as So... ...deas of utility, like those of duty and right, may be pushed to un- pleasant consequences. Nor can Plato in the Gorgias be deemed purely self-regardin... ...ime he makes a point of determining his main thesis independently of remoter consequences. (3) Plato s theory of punishment is partly vindictive, part... ...from them as if they were not figures but realities, is due to the defective logical analysis of his age. Nor does he distinguish between the sufferin... ...of the ordinary requirements of logic. Yet in the highest sense he is always logical and consistent with himself. The form of the argument may be para... ...tinent, he is, and always will be, the most miser- able of men. The greatest consequences for good or for evil cannot alter a hair s breadth the moral...

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The Theory of the Leisure Class

By: Thorstein Veblen

...ot pervade our daily life to the extent or with the far-reaching practical consequences that are apparent at earlier stages of culture and belief. T o... ...y imputes an unfolding of activity directed to some end. It is this teleo- logical unfolding of activity that constitutes any object or phenomenon an ... ...rth, or honour, as applied either to persons or conduct, is of first- rate consequence in the development of classes and of class distinctions, and it... ...worthy or beautiful, or even a blameless, human life. In itself and in its consequences the life of leisure is beautiful and ennobling in all civilise... ...oductive employment, it would in any case have come in as one of the early consequences of ownership. And it is to be remarked that while the leisure ... ...ntly becomes impracticable to accumulate wealth by simple seizure, and, in logical consistency, acquisition by industry is equally impossible for high... ...e extent by other features of human nature, alien to it, any saving should logically be impossible for a population situated as the artisan and labori... ...ure — the preda- tory animus — which in point of generality and of psycho- logical content lies between the two just named. The effect of the latter i... ...od of serv- ing their end, It may be in place to recall the modern psycho- logical position. Beauty of form seems to be a question of fa- cility of ap...

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The Subjection of Women

By: John Stuart Mill

...ing a verdict. If they do extort a hearing, they are subjected to a set of logical requirements totally different from those ex acted from other peop... ...e formed by an union of persons not very unequal in strength, afforded, in consequence, the first instance of a portion of human relations fenced roun... ... rule of general con duct, any other being only a special and exceptional consequence of peculiar ties— and from how very re cent a date it is that ... ...o it in all ranks of the people, espe cially among persons of station and consequence. Such is the power of an established system, even when far from... ...ts of mankind, depending on what an enlightened estimate of tendencies and consequences may show to be most advantageous to humanity in general, witho... ...fficulty than others have in obtaining their services. To this there is no logical answer except”I will not”: and as people are now not only ashamed, ... ...ter, and a master too of all their earthly possessions. And truly, if this consequence were necessarily incident to marriage, I think that the apprehe...

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Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...e revolving sun; often the whole dire catastrophe, together with its total consequences, is both accomplished and made known to those whom it chiefly ... ...we inhabited, there seemed to be a moral impossibility that any dangers of consequence should meet her in the course of those brief absences from my p... ...eebleness and the dependence of woman. I looked at him more attentively in consequence of the feeling tone in which he now spoke, and was surprised th... ... land in which all these events happened; neither is that of the slightest consequence. Guilty she was pronounced: but sentence at that time was defer... ...rom his keepers, and of no future moment, having passed by without present consequences. But had she, instead of thus reporting her own erroneous impr... ... was not very accurate in anything but in the use of logic. All his philo- logical attainments were imperfect. He did not talk German; or so obscurely... ...ay happen that a better valua- tion of it may disturb the whole edifice of logical inferences by which it seemed to favor the speculations of the war ... ...cdotes, and all simi- lar anecdotes, might be true, but were delusive. The logical vice in them was—that they substituted an occasion for a cause. The...

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Theological Essays and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...ove the gods. Under this original peculiarity of Paganism, there arose two consequences, which I will mark by the Greek letters [Greek text] and [Gree... ...er I will notice in its order, first calling the reader’s attention to the consequence marked [Greek text], which is this:—In the full and profoundest... ...ans regret, not penitence; and [Greek text], means, ‘I rue this act in its consequences,’ not ‘I repent of this act for its moral nature.’ A and D, th... ...ss, far less was it the exclusive business. The worship flowed as a direct consequence from the new idea exposed of the divine nature, and from the ne... ...ere not, in relation to its own absolute merits; and this treatment is the logical treatment, applying itself to what is permanent in the nature of th... ...., where the phrase, Church of That we stand on the brink of a great theo- logical crisis, that the problem must soon be solved, how far orthodox Chri... ...y in St. Paul, the words may be known, their sense may be known, but their logical relation is still doubtful. The word X and the word Y are separatel... ... one great difficulty in translating is to find words that even as to mere logical elements correspond to the origi- nal text. Even that is often a tr... ...o our own period, or from any consideration of time what- ever, but in the logical meaning, as having been derived from our reason in opposition to ou...

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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

By: Adam Smith

... particular orders of men, with- out any regard to, or foresight of, their consequences upon the gen- eral welfare of the society; yet they have given... ...ight hundredth, part of what they are at present capable of performing, in consequence of a proper division and combination of their different operati... ...rent trades and employments from one another, seems to have taken place in consequence of this advan- tage. This separation, too, is generally carried... ...bject, than when it is dissipated among a great variety of things. But, in consequence of the division of labour, the whole of every man’s attention c... ...he great multiplication of the productions of all the differ- ent arts, in consequence of the division of labour, which occa- sions, in a well-governe... ...Adam Smith cious writer, Mr Anderson, author of the Historical and Chrono- logical Deduction of Commerce, very justly observes, that upon examining th...

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Autobiography Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life

By: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

...le and reunitable substance, some finer chemical salt, or curious piece of logical joinery,—began to lose its immaterial, myste- rious, divine though ... ...interest: on the other hand, a certain rage for rhyme and versification, a consequence of reading the prevalent German poets, took complete possession... ...h other. These maladies, and other unpleasant interruptions, were in their consequences doubly grievous; for my father, who seemed to have laid down f... ...uch vain-glorious beginnings could not have gone on without producing evil consequences for myself in the end. Considering this impulse more closely, ... ... above as our neighbors, had not been remark- able during his lifetime, in consequence of his recluse habits, but became the more remarkable after his... ...earing away the external covering. This was done; but I became no wiser in consequence, as the naked iron taught me nothing further. This also I took ... ...e moments alone. Another circumstance increased my tendency to these theo- logical, or, rather, biblical, studies. The senior of the ministry, John Ph...

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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

By: John Locke

...re, there was one alteration which it was neces- sary to mention, because it ran through the whole book, and is of consequence to be rightly understoo... ...d to at first hearing, as that “one and two are equal to three,” that “green is not red,” &c., are received as the consequences of those more universa... ...ot but be known before? Or doth the proposing them print them clearer in the mind than nature did? If so, then the consequence will be, that a man kno... ...because it carries something more of positive in it than impenetrability; which is negative, and is perhaps more a consequence of solidity, than solid... ...o take notice, that this is one of the operations that the mind may reflect on and observe in itself It is of that consequence to its other knowledge,... ... mode of the organs of speech. 12. This art has perplexed religion and justice. Nor hath this mischief stopped in logical niceties, or curious empty ...

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Preface to Androcles and the Lion: On the Prospects of Christianity

By: George Bernard Shaw

...al times, and that modern theologians, far from discrediting it, have very logically affirmed the miraculous conception not only of Jesus but of his m... ...o condemnation as an impostor among people whose good opinion was of great consequence to the movement started by his mission. But the deepest annoyan... ...d on the eating of his body (losing all his disciples except the twelve in consequence); says many apparently contradictory and nonsensical things to ... ...they are smitten with the degeneracy which seems to be the inevitable bio- logical penalty of complete parasitism, and corrupt culture and statecraft ... ...n of moral malingerers who can be made to behave themselves by the fear of consequences; but it is not worth while maintaining an abominable system of... ...ristianity is, and owes its enormous vogue to being, a premium on sin. Its consequences have had to be held in check by the worldlywise majority throu... ...nal charm of Jesus, and exists only for untrained minds. In the hands of a logical Frenchman like Calvin, push- ing it to its utmost conclusions, and ... ...y of thirty-five per cent, which is fairly conclu- sive. And, being a more logical people than we, they have officially abandoned Christianity and dec...

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The Kreutzer Sonata and Other Stories

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

... of this tale points out how the hero Ivan might have avoided the terrible consequences of a quarrel with his neighbor (which grew out of nothing) if ... ...moral to which we all might profitably give heed. He illustrates the awful consequences of intemperance, and concludes that only kind treatment can re... ... from the fact that my father and my mother did not deceive each other. In consequence of this, I had built from childhood a dream of high and poetica... ...pating debauchery, but in favoring it, by assuring the harmlessness of the consequences. Besides, it is not a question of that. It is a question of th... ...lt of activity. The object of activ- ity cannot consist in suppressing its consequences. The object of Man, as of Humanity, is happiness, and, to atta... ...r than marriage, evidently the human race will come to an end. But, if the logical conclusion of the argument is that the human race will become extin...

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Philebus

By: Plato

... as we learn from the Memorabilia of Xenophon, first drew attention to the consequences of actions. Man- kind were said by him to act rightly when the... ...acknowledge that a large class of actions are made right or wrong by their consequences only; we say further that mankind are not too mindful, but tha... ... that mankind are not too mindful, but that they are far too regardless of consequences, and that they need to have the doctrine of utility habitually... ..., and the necessary foundation of that part of morals which relates to the consequences of actions, we still have to consider whether this or some oth... ...out entering on this wide field, even a superficial consider- ation of the logical and metaphysical works which pass under the name of Aristotle, whet... ...r of the other two, and in addition to them. SOCRATES: But do you see the consequence? 72 Philebus PROTARCHUS: To be sure I do. The consequence is,...

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Sophist

By: Plato

...e. But he is not to be regarded as the original inventor of any of the great logical forms, with the exception of the syllogism. There is little worth... ...e Sophists having an evil name; that, whether deserved or not, was a natural consequence of their vocation. That they were foreigners, that they made ... ...‘abscissio infinti,’ by which the Soph ist is taken, is a real and valuable logical pro cess. Modern science feels that this, like other processes o... ...n be caught in this way. But these divisions and subdivisions were favourite logical exercises of the age in which he lived; and while indulging his d... ...ed; and while indulging his dialectical fancy , and making a contribution to logical method, he delights also to transfix the Eristic Sophist with wea... ...oxes of Zeno extended far be yond the Eleatic circle. And now an unforeseen consequence began to arise. If the Many were not, if all things were name... ...d try our hand upon some more obvious animal, who may be made the subject of logical experiment; shall we say an angler? ‘V ery good.’ In the first pl... .... Suppose that you take all these hypoth eses in turn, and see what are the consequences which follow from each of them. STRANGER: Very good, and fir... ... sert discourse to be a kind of being; for if we could not, the worst of all consequences would follow; we should have no philosophy . Moreover , the ...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Two

By: Edgar Allan Poe

... reason which is cultivated in any especial form other than the abstractly logical. I dispute, in particular, the reason educed by math- ematical stud... ...g the stigma, it covers it with pollen sufficient for its impregnation, in consequence of which the flower soon begins to droop, and the hairs to shri... ...ve forgotten the explanation—how what I observed was, in fact, the natural consequence of the forms of the float- ing fragments—and showed me how it h... ...ounted to conviction. With it my reason had nothing to do. All attempts at logical inquiry resulted, indeed, in leaving me more sceptical than before.... ...aced in my hands. I read it with profound attention. Throughout I found it logical, but the portions which were not merely logical were unhappily the ... ...sity — the last in especial, from the immensely important character of its consequences. In looking around me for some subject by whose means I might ... ...skers, in violent contrast to the black- ness of his hair — the latter, in consequence, being very gen- erally mistaken for a wig. His temperament was... ...will reduce my phantasm to the common-place—some intellect more calm, more logical, and far less excitable than my own, which will perceive, in the ci... ..., all metaphysicianism have been con- cocted a priori. The intellectual or logical man, rather than the understanding or observant man, set himself to...

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The Forged Coupon, And Other Stories and Dramas

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

..., dancing, and carousing; but his irresponsible gaiety and heedlessness of consequences balanced by a fatalistic courage and endurance in the face of ... ...e but in evitable, and his renunciation of personal property the strictly logical outcome of his conclusions. The parti tion of his estates between ... ...tionalisation there explained pro vided Tolstoy with well thought out and logical reasons for a policy that was already more than sympathetic to him.... ...u. But when it is you who lose fifty four roubles at cards – that is of no consequence in your eyes.” “That is a different matter.” Leo Tolstoy 42 “... ...e in such a way. You forget what is due to my cloth.” “Your cloth is of no consequence to me.” “Your perversity in matters of religion is known to eve... ...ll the horse stealing; but nobody would give him away, being afraid of the consequences. Whenever suspicion fell on him, he managed to clear his chara... ...and some of these people began to grasp the meaning of the Gospels, and in consequence gave up smoking, drinking, swearing, and using bad language and...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Three

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...he wound in my neck, although of an ugly appearance, proved of little real consequence, and I soon recovered from its effects. The Penguin got into po... ...g the crew, and both our lives would most probably have been sacrificed in consequence. Having concluded to write, the difficulty was now to pro- cure... ... confirmed. The brig was rolling violently, and there was so much noise in consequence, that it was useless to listen for any weak sound, such as thos... ...d of screwing 50 Poe in Five V olumes has resulted in the most lamentable consequences, arising from a cause altogether distinct from the danger atte... ...n every fifteen or twenty minutes upon an average, yet without any serious consequences resulting, provided there be a proper stowage. If this, how- e... ...bit of quoting, with a very droll pro- nunciation, as the ne plus ultra of logical wit. Thus my own inkling for the Muses had excited his entire displ...

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The Republic

By: Plato

...epublic, and were probably first invented by Plato. The 3 greatest of all logical truths, and the one of which writers on philosophy are most apt to ... ... confu sion of them in his own writings. But he does not bind up truth in logical formulae,—logic is still veiled in metaphys ics; and the science w... ...ts that justice and injustice shall be considered without regard to their consequences, Adeimantus remarks that they are re garded by mankind in ge... ...that they are re garded by mankind in general only for the sake of their consequences; and in a similar vein of reflection he urges at the beginnin... ...s not the first but the second thing, not the direct aim but the indirect consequence of the good government of a State. In the discussion about rel... ...o good to the just and harm to the unjust? I like that better. But see the consequence:—Many a man who is ignorant of human nature has friends who ar... ... not some which we welcome for their own sakes, and independently of their consequences, as, for example, harmless pleasures and enjoyments, which del...

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An Enemy of the People

By: Henrik Ibsen

...ockmann. The water supply for the Baths is now an established fact, and in consequence must be treated as such. But probably the Committee, at its dis... ...x- traordinarily independent man, Thomas. Have you given no thought to the consequences this may have for your- self? Dr. Stockmann. Consequences?—for... ...He no longer dares to think independently, or to pursue his ideas to their logical conclusion; so, he turns the whole theory upside down and proclaims...

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The Ethics of Aristotle

By: J. A. Smith

... de- ficient in “exactness,” in precision of statement, and close- ness of logical concatenation. We must not look for a math- ematics of conduct. The... ...l and impossible as on those which are in our own power: again, Opinion is logically divided into true and false, not into good and bad as Moral Choic... ... see then that all men mean by the term Justice a moral state such that in consequence of it men have the capacity of doing what is just, and actually... ...it: simi- larly also with respect to Injustice, a moral state such that in consequence of it men do unjustly and wish what is unjust: let us also be c... ...red what was deposited with him, but against his will and from fear of the consequences of a refusal: we must not say that he either does what is just... ...dle term being fallacious: and so neither will this be yet Good Counsel in consequence of which you get what you ought but not through proper means. A... ...s belonging to the body,” etc. P . 32, l. 32. Being about to give a strict logical definition of Virtue, Aristotle ascertains first what is its genus ... ... opening statement of the Post Analytics. P . 133, l. 27. Aristotle in his logical analysis of Induction, Prior. Analytics II. 25, defines it to be “t... ...” (See the appendix to this Book.) P 134 1 12. This is the test of correct logical division, that the membra dividentia shall be opposed, i.e. not inc...

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War and Peace

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

..., all that was not quite good was rejected. And this was not the result of logical reasoning but was a direct and mysterious reflection. CHAPTER XI TW... ...mother’s language, “Prince Alexander Golitsyn has founded a society and in consequence has great influence, they say.” “Arakcheev and Golitsyn,” incau... ... sign of something being wrong be- tween them if Pierre followed a line of logical reasoning. When he began proving anything, or talking argumentative... ... me in time cannot seem to me as free as the life of a con- temporary, the consequences of which are still unknown to me. The degree of our conception... ...n an action 99 Tolstoy still more remote, ten years ago or more, then the consequences of my action are still plainer to me and I find it hard to ima... ...overnment was estab- lished or certain migrations of peoples took place in consequence of such and such geographic, ethnographic, or economic condi- t...

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Howards End

By: E. M. Forster

...d the tele- gram for me, and then I had to say that the telegram was of no consequence, for Paul said Charles might read it, and though I wrote it out... ... Four Serious Songs if I do.” “Tibby, love, you must go.” “It isn’t of any consequence,” said the young man, in truth a little uneasy about his umbrel... .... Wilcox had just gone away for the night. Margaret said that it was of no consequence, hur- ried downstairs, and took a hansom to King’s Cross. She w... ...r played with life. They had attempted friendship, and they would take the consequences. Helen retorted, “I call that a very rude remark. What do you ... ...d would rather furnish her home with our things than think of it empty. In consequence here are all the library books.” “Not all the books. She hasn’t... ...ible to Margaret that healthy life should re-emerge. Events succeeded in a logical, yet senseless, train. People lost their humanity, and took values ... ...erge, were all survivals, and the melting-pot was being prepared for them. Logically, they had no right to be alive. One’s hope was in the weakness of...

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