Yashmak

Yashmak (Halide Edip)

A yashmak, yashmac or yasmak (from Turkish yaşmak, "a veil"[1]) is a Turkish type of veil or niqab worn by some Muslim women to cover their faces in public. Today there is almost no usage of this Islamic garment in Turkey.

Unlike an ordinary veil, a yashmak contains a head-veil and a face-veil in one, thus consisting of two pieces of fine muslin, one tied across the face under the nose, and the other tied across the forehead draping the head.

A yashmak can also include a rectangle of woven black horsehair attached close to the temples and sloping down like an awning to cover the face, called peçe, or it can be a veil covered with pieces of lace, having slits for the eyes, tied behind the head by strings and sometimes supported over the nose by a small piece of gold.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ From an identical Old Turkish verb meaning indeed "to cover, hide". The original verb has become obsolete and a new verb, yaşmak-la-mak [segmented ad hoc], "to veil", has developed.

External links

  • Turkey's Ministry of Culture and Tourism - The Costumes Of Ottoman Women


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