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Willow Weep for Me

"Willow Weep for Me"
Music by Ann Ronell
Lyrics by Ann Ronell
Published 1932
Language English
Original artist Ted Fio Rito
Recorded by See Notable Recordings

"Willow Weep for Me" is a popular song composed in 1932 by Ann Ronell, who also wrote the lyrics. The song form is AABA and it is written in 4/4 time,[1] although it is occasionally adapted for 3/4 waltz time, as on recordings by Phil Woods (Musique du Bois, 1974) and Dr. Lonnie Smith (Jungle Soul, 2006.) It is mostly known as a jazz standard, having been recorded first by Ted Fio Rito (with vocal by Muzzy Marcellino) in October 1932 and by Paul Whiteman (with vocal by Irene Taylor) the following month. Both were hits in December 1932.[2] It was a Top 40 hit for the British duo Chad & Jeremy in 1964; the song was released on their Yesterday's Gone album and reached No. 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 1 on the Adult Contemporary chart.[3]

One account of the inspiration for the song is that, during her time at Irving Berlin, who chose to accept it. Other reasons stated for its slow acceptance are that it was written by a woman and that its construction was unusually complex for a composition that was targeted at a commercial audience (i.e. radio broadcast, record sales and sheet music sales).[1] An implied tempo change in the fifth bar, a result of a switch from the two quavers and a quaver triplet opening in each of the first four bars to just four quavers opening the fifth, then back to two quavers and a quaver triplet opening the sixth bar, which then has a more offset longer note than any of the previous bars, was one cause of Bornstein's concern.[1][4] Notable recordings continued from the early 1950s, following the success of Stan Kenton's 1950 release (with vocal by June Christy) of the song.[1][2]

Contents

  • Notable recordings 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Notable recordings

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Zimmers, Tighe, E. (2009). Tin Pan Alley Girl: A Biography of Ann Ronell. McFarland. pp. 19-22.
  2. ^ a b c Gioia, Ted (2012). The Jazz Standards: A Guide to the Repertoire. Oxford University Press. pp. 460-462.
  3. ^  
  4. ^ The New Real Book (1988). Sher Music. p. 406.
  5. ^ One By OneThe Coasters, Retrieved February 22, 2012
  6. ^ The Greatest Horn in the WorldAl Hirt, Retrieved April 6, 2013.
  7. ^ "Pearls overview".  
  8. ^ "Willow Weep for Me - Single by The Kills".  

External links

  • jazzstandards.com
  • Full lyrics of this song at MetroLyrics
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