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White separatism

White separatism is a separatist political movement that seeks separate economic and cultural development for white people. White separatism is a form of White nationalism and can be a form of White supremacy.[1]

White separatists generally claim genetic affiliation with Anglo-Saxon cultures, Nordic cultures, or other white European cultures. Some also affiliate with white ethnic cultures that developed outside of Europe, like the Neo-Confederates and Boer-Afrikaner Nationalists.

Advocates of racial separatism say that separatism differs from racial supremacy in that separatists believe that all races and ethnic groups have the right to develop their own culture separately and any race should not dominate another. They argue that racial differences are important and they strongly oppose miscegenation.

Critics argue that contemporary white separatism is a public facade adopted by white supremacists.[2]

Racial separatism differs from racial segregation, which is characterized by separation of different racial groups within the same state—that is racial separation in daily life, such as eating in restaurants, drinking from water fountains, using restrooms, attending school, going to the movies, or in renting or purchasing a home. Racial segregation is enforced by the government of a multiracial nation, as in South Africa under apartheid, which seeks to separate different cultures within the borders of the same state.

The concept of homeland separatism is that all different ethnic or racial groups have the right to self-determination in their own homeland. The view is that no cultural group should govern over another, and different cultures should live in peace and harmony with each other by developing separately in their own nation state.

Notable white separatists

See also

References

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