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Urbano Rattazzi

Urbano Rattazzi
3rd Prime Minister of Italy
In office
March 3, 1862 – December 8, 1862
Monarch Victor Emmanuel II
Preceded by Bettino Ricasoli
Succeeded by Luigi Carlo Farini
In office
April 10, 1867 – October 27, 1867
Monarch Victor Emmanuel II
Preceded by Bettino Ricasoli
Succeeded by Luigi Federico Menabrea
Personal details
Born (1808-06-20)June 20, 1808
Alessandria
Died June 5, 1873(1873-06-05) (aged 64)
Frosinone
Political party Historical Left
Signature

Urbano Pio Francesco Rattazzi (Italian pronunciation: ; June 29, 1808 – June 5, 1873) was an Italian statesman.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Family 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5

Biography

He was born in Alessandria (Piedmont). He studied law at Turin, and in 1838 began his practice, which met with marked success at the capital and Casale. In 1848, Rattazzi was sent to the Sardinian chamber of deputies in Turin as representative of his native town. He allied himself with the Liberal party, i.e. Democrats. By his debating powers, he contributed to the defeat of the Balbo ministry, and in August received the portfolio of Public Instruction, though he left office after a few days. In December, in the Gioberti cabinet, he became Minister of the Interior, and on the fall of Gioberti, in February 1849, Rattazzi was entrusted with the formation of a new cabinet. The defeat at Novara compelled Rattazzi's resignation in March 1849.[1]

He left the Democrats for the Moderate Liberals, and formed the group of the center-left. This party formed a coalition with the center-right headed by Minister of Justice and later Minister of the Interior. As Minister of the Interior, he carried a number of measures of reform, including that for the suppression of certain of the monastic orders, partial secularization of church property, and restricting the influence of the religious associations. This precipitated a bitter struggle with the Clerical party. During a momentary reaction of public opinion he resigned office in 1858, but again entered the cabinet under La Marmora in 1859 as Minister of the Interior.[1]

In consequence of the negotiations for the cession of Nice and Savoy to France, which cession he opposed, he again retired in January 1860. On changing his views on this policy, he became president of the lower chamber in the first Italian Parliament, and in March 1862 succeeded Ricasoli in the government, retaining for himself the portfolios of Foreign Affairs and of the Interior. However, in consequence of his policy of repression towards Garibaldi at Aspromonte, he was driven from office in the following December. He was again Prime Minister in 1867, from April to October. Popular reaction to his hostility to Garibaldi again drove him from office. He died at Frosinone on 5 June 1873.[1]

Family

His wife, Laetitia Marie Wyse Bonaparte, whom he married in 1863, was a noted French novelist and a grandniece of Emperor Napoleon I.[1] Together they had one daughter: Romana Rattazzi (1871-1943).

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e   This work in turn cites:
    •  
    • King, Bolton (1899). History of Italian Unity. London. 

References

  •  Rines, George Edwin, ed. (1920). "Rattazzi, Urbano".  

Further reading

 "Rattazzi, Urbano".

Political offices
Preceded by
Carlo Bon Compagni di Mombello
Piedmontese Minister of the Instruction
1848
Succeeded by
Vincenzo Gioberti
Preceded by
Felice Merlo
Piedmontese Minister of Justice
1848-1849
Succeeded by
Riccardo Sineo
Preceded by
Riccardo Sineo
Piedmontese Minister of the Interior
1849
Succeeded by
Pier Dionigi Pinelli
Preceded by
Pier Dionigi Pinelli
Chairman of the Piedmontese Chamber of Deputies
1852–1853
Succeeded by
Carlo Bon Compagni di Mombello
Preceded by
Carlo Bon Compagni di Mombello
Piedmontese Minister of Justice
1853-1855
Succeeded by
Giovanni De Foresta
Preceded by
Gustavo Ponza di San Martino
Piedmontese Minister of the Interior
1854-1858
Succeeded by
Camillo Benso di Cavour
Preceded by
Carlo Bon Compagni di Mombello
Chairman of the Piedmontese Chamber of Deputies
1859–1860
Succeeded by
Giovanni Lanza
Preceded by
Camillo Benso di Cavour
Piedmontese Minister of the Interior
1859-1860
Succeeded by
Camillo Benso di Cavour
Preceded by
Giovanni Lanza
Chairman of the Italian Chamber of Deputies
1861–1862
Succeeded by
Sebastiano Tecchio
Preceded by
Bettino Ricasoli
Prime Minister of Italy
1862
Succeeded by
Luigi Carlo Farini
Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs
1862
Succeeded by
Giuseppe Pasolini
Italian Minister of the Interior
1862
Succeeded by
Ubaldino Peruzzi
Preceded by
Bettino Ricasoli
Prime Minister of Italy
1867
Succeeded by
Luigi Federico Menabrea
Italian Minister of the Interior
1867
Succeeded by
Filippo Antonio Gualterio

 

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