World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Unemployment in Brazil

The rate of unemployment in Brazil is determined by the Monthly Employment Survey, coordinated by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE). This research examines the economically active population (PEA) of the six largest metropolitan areas (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Porto Alegre, Salvador and Recife).

Contents

  • Definition of unemployment 1
  • Results 2
  • Unemployment rate (%) 3
  • References 4

Definition of unemployment

The IBGE classifies as unemployed those who were not working, were available for work and had taken action to get work in the thirty days preceding the survey.

For research conducted between 1983 and 2002, the IBGE considered working age population (PIA), to be those over the age of fifteen. Under the new methodology the age limit was raised to eighteen. To be considered employed, the institute once set the threshold at 15 hours per week. The new study lowers that to one hour per week.

Results

The highest unemployment rate registered since January 2002 was April 2004 (13.1%) and the lowest was December 2011 (4.7%). Only twice, in 2006 and 2009, did the rate rise in the previous year. In the end of 2013, the unemployment rate fell to a record low 4.3% in December from an already low 4.6% in November. This marks the lowest since the current version of the Brazilian unemployment rate was first reported in 2002. A comparison with the pre-2002 unemployment rate index suggested that was the tightest labor market since at least 1980.

Unemployment rate (%)

Years/Months Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 12.2 11.9
2002 10.8 11.1 12.6 12.9 12.5 11.9 11.6 11.9 11.7 11.5 11.2 10.9 12.6
2003 11.2 11.6 12.1 12.4 12.8 13.0 12.8 13.0 12.9 12.9 12.2 10.9 12.3
2004 11.7 12.0 12.8 13.1 12.2 11.7 11.2 11.4 10.9 10.5 10.6 9.6 11.4
2005 10.2 10.6 10.8 10.8 10.2 9.4 9.4 9.4 9.6 9.6 9.6 8.3 9.8
2006 9.2 10.1 10.4 10.4 10.2 10.4 10.7 10.6 10.0 9.8 9.5 8.4 9.9
2007 9.3 9.9 10.1 10.1 10.1 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.0 8.7 8.2 7.4 9.3
2008 8.0 8.7 8.6 8.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 7.6 7.6 7.5 7.6 6.8 7.8
2009 8.4 8.5 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.1 8.0 8.1 7.7 7.5 7.4 6.8 8.1
2010 7.2 7.4 7.6 7.3 7.5 7.0 6.9 6.7 6.2 6.1 5.7 5.3 6.7
2011 6.1 6.4 6.5 6.4 6.4 6.2 6.0 6.0 6.0 5.8 5.2 4.7 6.0
2012 4.7 5.5 5.7 6.2 6.0 5.8 5.9 5.4 5.3 5.4 5.3 5.9 5.6
2013 4.6 5.4 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.8 6.0 5.6 5.3 5.4 5.2 4.6 5.1

References

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.