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Thomas Cooper (representative)

Thomas Cooper
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Delaware's Second At-large district
In office
March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1817
Preceded by seat gained in reapportionment
Succeeded by Willard Hall
Personal details
Born 1764
Little Creek Hundred, Delaware
Died July 1, 1829(1829-07-01) (aged 65)
Delaware
Political party Federalist
Relations Governor William B. Cooper
Parents Isaac Cooper and Comfort Townsend Barkley Cooper
Residence Delaware
Profession Lawyer, Politician
Religion Methodist

Thomas Cooper (1764–1829) was an Delaware lawyer and politician who was a Federalist member of the United States House of Representatives. He served in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Congresses.

Contents

  • Early life and career 1
  • Political career 2
  • After leaving Congress 3
  • Almanac 4
  • References 5
  • Further reading 6
  • External links 7

Early life and career

Cooper was born in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, the son of Isaac and Comfort Townsend Barkley Cooper. Cooper's grandfather, Barkley Townsend, came to Laurel in 1768 from Dorchester County, Maryland and at one time owned nearly the whole area. His father Isaac served in the Delaware General Assembly, and was a member of the Delaware convention that ratified the U.S. Constitution in 1787. Isaac was also a member of the 1792 Delaware Constitutional Convention. Cooper's brother was Governor William B. Cooper.[1]

Cooper completed his preparatory studies at his home in Little Creek Hundred. After studying the law with James P. Wilson, he was

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
New seat gained by reappointment
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Delaware's at-large congressional district

March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1817
Succeeded by
Willard Hall


  • Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress
  • Delaware's Members of Congress
  • Find A Grave
  • Delaware Historical Society
  • University of Delaware

External links

  • Conrad, Henry C. (1908). History of the State of Delaware. Lancaster, Pennsylvania: Wickersham Company. 
  • Hoffecker, Carol E. (2004). Democracy in Delaware. Wilmington, Delaware: Cedar Tree Books.  
  • Martin, Roger A. (1984). A History of Delaware Through its Governors. Wilmington, Delaware: McClafferty Press. 
  • Scharf, John Thomas (1888). History of Delaware 1609-1888. 2 vols. Philadelphia: L. J. Richards & Co. 
  • Wilson, Emerson. (1969). Forgotten Heroes of Delaware. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Deltos Publishing Company. 

Further reading

  1. ^ Scharf, John Thomas (1888). General History. L. J. Richards. p. 573. 
  2. ^ Scharf, John Thomas (1888). General History. L. J. Richards. p. 573. 
  3. ^ Conrad, Henry Clay (1908). History of the State of Delaware, Volume 3. Henry Clay Conrad. p. 1027. 
  4. ^ Conrad, Henry Clay (1908). History of the State of Delaware, Volume 3. Henry Clay Conrad. p. 1027. 

References

Election results
Year Office Subject Party votes % Opponent Party votes %
1812 U.S. Representative Thomas Cooper Federalist 4,183 28% Richard C. Dale Republican 3,210 22%
1814 U.S. Representative Thomas Cooper Federalist 3,960 30% Willard Hall Republican 2,547 20%
United States Congressional service
Dates Congress Chamber Majority President Committees Class/District
1813–1815 13th U.S. House Republican James Madison 2nd at-large
1815–1817 14th U.S. House Republican James Madison 2nd at-large
Delaware General Assembly service
Dates Assembly Chamber Majority Governor Committees District
1803 28th State House Federalist David Hall Sussex at-large
1804 29th State House Federalist Nathaniel Mitchell Sussex at-large
1805 30th State House Federalist Nathaniel Mitchell Sussex at-large
1806 31st State House Federalist Nathaniel Mitchell Sussex at-large
1807 32nd State House Federalist George Truitt Sussex at-large
1808 33rd State Senate Federalist George Truitt Sussex at-large
1809 34th State Senate Federalist George Truitt Sussex at-large
1810 35th State Senate Federalist Joseph Haslet Sussex at-large
Public Offices
Office Type Location Began office Ended office notes
State House Legislature Dover January 6, 1803 January 6, 1808
State Senator Legislature Dover January 6, 1808 January 5, 1811
U.S. Representative Legislature Washington March 4, 1813 March 3, 1817

Elections were held the first Tuesday of October and members of the General Assembly took office the first Tuesday of January. State Senators had a three-year term and State Representatives terms of one year. U.S. Representatives took office March 4 and have a two-year term.

Almanac

Cooper died at Georgetown, Delaware in 1829 and was buried in the Cooper family cemetery near Laurel, Delaware.

In 1817 Cooper retired from the U.S. House, but continued the practice of law in Georgetown until his death. Among Cooper's students were Edward Wooten and Caleb S. Layton. Cooper was regarded as a professional and knowledgeable lawyer to his peers.[4]

After leaving Congress

Cooper was a member of the Federalist Party and began his political career as a member of the State House of Representatives, where he served from 1803 to 1807. He then served a term in the State Senate from 1808 to 1810, until he was elected to the House of Representatives in 1813. Cooper served in the House from March 4, 1813 to March 3, 1817.[3]

Political career

[2]

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