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Tehrangeles

Persian shops along Westwood Boulevard in South Westwood. Westwood is also known as "Little Persia".

Tehrangeles is a portmanteau deriving from the combination of Tehran, the capital of Iran, and Los Angeles. It is used when referring to the large number (estimates range from 700,000 to 800,000) of former Iranian nationals and their descendants residing in the Los Angeles metropolitan area after the 1979 Revolution left many families displaced; it is the largest such population outside of Iran.[1][2][3] In common usage, it usually refers to the proportionally larger Persian-American subset of Iranian immigrants, many of whom are second generation citizens.[4] The intersection of Westwood Boulevard and Wilkins Avenue is now officially recognized by the City of Los Angeles as "Persian Square".[5]

Contents

  • Origin 1
  • Distribution 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Origin

Persian businesses in the L.A. area originally centered in the Westwood neighborhood of the Westside. Iranian-owned businesses are particularly prevalent on Westwood Boulevard between Wilshire Boulevard (in Westwood) to Pico Boulevard (in West L.A.).

Often referred to as Little Persia or Persian Hills/Persian Square, it is between Beverly Hills and West Los Angeles. Immigration to the area increased several-fold due to the events surrounding the 1979 Iranian Revolution. Westwood Boulevard became known for its many Persian shops and restaurants; and the Persian expatriate community of Los Angeles entered all forms of media including magazines, newspapers, radio, and television stations.

Distribution

Westwood skyline.

As the population grew, many Iranians have moved all over Los Angeles, with other large neighborhoods forming in the Los Angeles neighborhoods of Tarzana, Woodland Hills, and Encino in the San Fernando Valley and Beverly Hills, California, the city of Irvine, as well throughout Orange County; and Persians also made their homes in San Diego and the Palm Springs area (Coachella Valley).

See also

References

  1. ^ MacFarquhar, Neil (May 9, 2006). "Exiles in 'Tehrangeles' Are Split on Iran".  
  2. ^  
  3. ^  
  4. ^ Dickerman, Sara (June 7, 2009). "Persian Cooking Finds a Home in Los Angeles".  
  5. ^  

External links

  • Uhler, Andy (August 19, 2015). "Will Iran nuclear deal affect Persian businesses in L.A.?".  

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