World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Salado River, Argentina

Article Id: WHEBN0025468438
Reproduction Date:

Title: Salado River, Argentina  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Geography of Argentina, Monk Parakeet, Salta Province, Santiago del Estero Province, Santa Fe Province, Santa Fe, Argentina, List of rivers by length, 2003 Santa Fe flood, 2003 in Argentina, Thomas Joseph Hutchinson
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Salado River, Argentina

For other rivers in Argentina named Salado see here


The Salado River (Spanish: Río Salado,[1] Spanish pronunciation: [ˈri.o saˈlaðo] "Salty River") is a river that crosses several provinces of Argentina, flowing 1,150 kilometres (710 mi)[2] from its source in the Salta Province to end in the Paraná River, in the Santa Fe Province. Because its origin, its flow varies widely within the year, and it can dry out in some parts of its path during the winter. The only important tributary to the river is the Horcones River, which is born in Salta as Cajón River, and joins the Salado in the Santiago del Estero Province.

Higher Salado

The Salado originates on the eastern edge of the Altiplano under the name of Juramento River at the Andes range, from thaw and captured precipitations of the 6,500 metre high Acay and Cachi mountains in the Salta Province, near Catamarca Province. The Cabra Corral Dam regulates its flow, and deviates some of it for irrigation.

When the river enters the Gran Chaco plains it forms several arms in a broad riverbed only partially occupied.[2]

Santiago del Estero

The river then enters the Santiago del Estero Province from the north, near the border with the Tucumán Province, receiving the name of Salado. The Salado and the Dulce River ("Sweet River") south to it, run diagonally in direction south-east, and are the most important rivers to cross the arid lands of Santiago del Estero, being the economic and demographic axis of the province.

The flow of the river is regulated in the Figueroa Department by the Los Figueroa Reservoir, and by a Derivation Dam (Dique Derivador) that re-routes part of its waters to irrigation canals of up to 200 kilometres in length. Further downstream, the river forms wide marsh wetlands and areas flooded seasonally, during the summer's major high waters. Downstream of the Añatuya marshlands the streamflow is greatly reduced, rendering the river dry most of the year.[2]

Lower Salado

After a course of 800 kilometres inside Santiago del Estero, the river reaches the Santa Fe Province as Salado del Norte ("Northern Salty") to finally join the Paraná River in that province, being the last important tributary to the Paraná.

The more abundant rainfall in Santa Fe Province causes the Salado's discharge to increase.[2] During rainy summers, the river can overflow its riverbed producing floods. A 2003 flood severely affected the city of Santa Fe.

The Salado debouches into the Paraná River southeast of Santa Fe City, in a flooding area with lagoons.[2]

Other Argentine rivers called Salado

There are other, less important Salado rivers in Argentina, the most important of them being:

See also

Coordinates: 31°41′2″S 60°44′33″W / 31.68389°S 60.74250°W / -31.68389; -60.74250[3]

References

External links

  • Salado River at Monografias.com (Spanish)
  • Rio Salado: INTA's Planification (Spanish)
  • Political History of the Salado (Spanish)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.