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Qing official headwear

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Title: Qing official headwear  
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Subject: Qing dynasty, Kokoshnik, List of headgear, Insignia, Ming official headwear
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Qing official headwear

Qing Guanmao (清代官帽) was the headwear of officials during the Qing dynasty (1644–1912) in China. It consisted of a black velvet cap in winter, or a hat woven in rattan or similar materials in summer, both with a button on the top. The button or knob would become a finial during formal court ceremonies held by the Emperor. Officials would have to change their tops on the hat, for non-formal ceremonies or daily businesses. Red silk tassels extended down from the finial to cover the hat, and a large peacock feather (with one to three "eyes") could be attached to the back of the hat, should the merit of wearing it have been granted by the emperor.

The colour and shape of the finial depended on the wearer's grade. The royalty and nobility used various numbers of pearls. An officer of the first grade wore a translucent red ball (originally ruby); second grade, solid red ball (originally coral); third grade, translucent blue ball (originally sapphire); fourth grade, solid blue ball; fifth grade, translucent white ball (originally crystal); sixth grade, solid white ball (originally mother of pearl). Officers of the seventh to ninth grade wore gold or clear amber balls of varied designs.

Qing officials also wore a mandarin square rank badge.

See also


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