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Petit four

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Title: Petit four  
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Subject: List of French desserts, List of desserts, List of pastries, Android version history, Cakes
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Petit four

Petit four
An assortment of petits fours
Type Confectionery
Course Dessert
Place of origin France
Main ingredients Varies by type
Cookbook:Petit four 
French assortment of petits fours

A petit four (plural: petit fours, also known as mignardises) is a small confectionery or savoury appetizer. The name is French, petit four (French pronunciation: ​), meaning "small oven".

Contents

  • History 1
  • Types 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

History

Petits fours were traditionally made in a smaller oven next to the main oven.[1] In the 18th century some bakers made them during the cooling process of coal-fired brick ovens to take advantage of their stored heat, thus exploiting coal's high burning temperature and economizing on its high expense relative to wood.

Types

Petits fours come in three varieties:

In a French patisserie, assorted small desserts are usually called mignardises, while hard, buttery biscuits are called petit fours.

See also

References

  • Garrett, Toba. Professional Cake Decorating. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2007. Page 226.
  • Kingslee, John. A Professional Text to Bakery and Confectionary. New Delhi, India: New Age International, 2006. Page 244.
  • Maxfield, Jaynie. Cake Decorating for the First Time. New York: Sterling Pub, 2003. Page 58.
  • Rinsky, Glenn, and Laura Halpin Rinsky. The Pastry Chef's Companion: A Comprehensive Resource Guide for the Baking and Pastry Professional. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Page 214.
  1. ^ http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodcookies.html 2 January 2014
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