World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Palace of the Dukes of Lorraine

Article Id: WHEBN0028127120
Reproduction Date:

Title: Palace of the Dukes of Lorraine  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: French art, List of museums in France
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Palace of the Dukes of Lorraine

Coordinates: 48°41′49″N 6°10′49″E / 48.69694°N 6.18028°E / 48.69694; 6.18028


The Ducal Palace of Nancy or Palais ducal du Nancy is a palace in Nancy, France, which was home to the Dukes of Lorraine. It houses the Musée Lorrain, one of Nancy's principal museums, dedicated to the art, history and popular traditions of Lorraine until the early 20th century.[1]

History

The palace was built in the 15th century for René II, Duke of Lorraine.[2]

In the 18th century the palace was extended by Baroque architects. Under the rule of Leopold, Duke of Lorraine parts of the building were pulled down, in preparation of greater projects, he intended. After the House of Habsburg had given Lorraine under French control in change for Tuscany, the ducal palace in Nancy became the home of Stanisław Leszczyński.[3] After Stanisław's death, his Duchy was inherited by his son-in-law, King Louis XV of France and incorporated in his dominions.

The first level of the structure contains reception and dining rooms used by the Dukes, known as the Galerie des Cerfs. On the ground floor, there is an open-vaulted gallery overlooking the garden, while a portal marks the Grande Rue entrance. Also built in Gothic style, its décor suggests that it is one of the earliest examples of work from the Renaissance period in nowaday's eastern France.

Musée Lorrain

In 1848 the palace was converted to house the Musée Lorrain.[4] The museum's collections include artefacts from the Gallo-Roman and Merovingian civilisations of the east of France, religious and funeral sculptures and stained-glass windows from the Medieval period, as well as armaments from the 14th and 15th centuries. The museum also includes a collection of Renaissance art including works by Ligier Richier and sculptures relating to the history of the Palace itself, as well as of major works by Georges de La Tour and Jacques Callot, and a rare collection of Jewish ritual objects.

See also

References

External links

  • Ministry of Culture database entry for the palace (French)
  • Ministry of Culture photos

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.