World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Pâté

Article Id: WHEBN0000842227
Reproduction Date:

Title: Pâté  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Charcuterie, Offal, Belgian cuisine, Sausage, Solomon Gundy
Collection: Belgian Cuisine, Charcuterie, French Cuisine, Garde Manger, Offal, Spreads (Food)
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Pâté

Pâté
Various pâtés and terrines
Type Spread
Place of origin France Belgium
Main ingredients Ground meat, fat
Cookbook: Pâté 

Pâté (UK or US ; French pronunciation: ​) is a mixture of cooked ground meat and fat minced into a spreadable paste. Common additions include vegetables, herbs, spices, and either wine or brandy (often cognac or armagnac). Pâté can be served either hot or cold, but it is considered to develop its fullest flavor after a few days of chilling.[1]

Variations

Wild boar terrine
Paszteciki szczecińskie with barszcz as fast food

In French or Belgian cuisine, pâté may be baked in a crust as pie or loaf, in which case it is called pâté en croûte, or baked in a terrine (or other mold), in which case it is known as pâté en terrine. Traditionally, a forcemeat mixture cooked and served in a terrine is also called a terrine. The most famous pâté is probably pâté de foie gras, made from the livers of fattened geese. Foie gras entier is fattened goose liver cooked and sliced, not made into pâté. Pâté en croûte is baked with the insertion of "chimneys" on top: small tubes or funnels that allow steam to escape, thus keeping the pastry crust from turning damp or soggy. Baked pâté en croûte usually develops an air bubble under the crust top as the meat mixture shrinks during baking; this is traditionally dealt with by infusing semi-liquid aspic in the hollow space before chilling.

In the Netherlands, Finland, Germany, Romania, Hungary, Sweden, Denmark and Austria, some liver pâtés are shaped as a soft, often spreadable sausage, called leverworst (Dutch), májpástétom/májkrém (Hungarian), or Leberwurst (German). In the United States these are sometimes called "liverwurst" (mixing English and German), or braunschweiger. Some liverwursts can be sliced. In the US, sliced liverwurst is used as a sandwich filler. Others are spreadable as most French or Belgian pâté; these types are more popular in the United Kingdom. In Scandinavia and the Netherlands, leverpostej is a popular baked pâté similar to the French pâté en terrine, usually made of lard and pork liver.

In Poland, pasztet is made from poultry, fish, venison, ham, or pork with eggs, flour, bread crumbs, and a varied range of additions, such as pepper, tomato sauce, mushrooms, spices, vegetables, ginger, nutmeg, cheese, or sugar. A local form of pasztet is pasztecik szczeciński, a deep-fried yeast dough stuffed with meat or vegetarian filling, typical fast food dish of the city of Szczecin.

In Russia and Ukraine, the dish is mostly prepared with beef, goose or chicken liver[2] and thus is commonly known as печёночный паштет (Russian, pechyonochniy pashtet), however other meats also can be used. Unlike the Western European method the liver is first cooked (boiled or fried) and mixed with butter and/or fat and seasoning, such as fresh or fried onion, carrots, spices and herbs. It can be further cooked (usually baked), but most often is used without any other preparation. The pâté is served on bread, often with dill or other fresh herbs. In the former Yugoslavia, pašteta or паштета (a thinly pureed pâté) is a very popular bread spread usually made from chicken, beef, turkey or less commonly tuna or salmon. In Vietnam, pâté (gan xay) is commonly used on bánh mì baguette type sandwiches.[3] Pâté of this type is more commonly made from liver.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Terrines and Pates". The French Chef. By Julia Child. WGBH Boston.
  2. ^ enjoyyourcooking.com
  3. ^ Pork and Pâté Vietnamese Sandwich (Banh Mi)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.