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Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area

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Title: Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Omaha Star, Omaha, Nebraska, Nebraska, Cass County, Nebraska, Douglas County, Nebraska
Collection: Geography of Omaha, Nebraska, Metropolitan Areas of Iowa, Metropolitan Areas of Nebraska, Regions of Iowa, Regions of Nebraska
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Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area

Omaha metro
Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area
Map of Omaha metro
Country United States
State(s)
Largest city Omaha
Other cities
Area
 • Total 4,407 sq mi (11,410 km2)
Population
 • Total 904,421 ( 2,014 estimate)
 • Rank 57th in the U.S.
 • Density 196/sq mi (76/km2)

The Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area is a metropolitan area comprising the cities of Omaha, Nebraska, and Council Bluffs, Iowa, and surrounding areas. The area has a population of 904,421 (2014).[1] The metropolitan area, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget, consists of eight counties – five in Nebraska and three in Iowa.[2][3] The area is locally referred to as "the Metro Area", "the Metro", or simply "Omaha". Three of the counties have large urban areas; the other five counties consist primarily of rural communities, most of which have populations of 1,000 or less.

Contents

  • Historical definitions and populations 1
  • Components of the Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area 2
    • Counties 2.1
      • Nebraska 2.1.1
      • Iowa 2.1.2
    • Cities 2.2
      • Primary city 2.2.1
      • Cities of 10,000 people or more 2.2.2
      • Cities of 5,000 to 10,000 people 2.2.3
      • Cities of 1,000 to 5,000 people 2.2.4
      • Cities and villages with fewer than 1,000 people 2.2.5
      • Census-designated places 2.2.6
      • Population information 2.2.7
      • Annexations of formerly incorporated places by the City of Omaha 2.2.8
  • Notes 3
  • External links 4

Historical definitions and populations

View from space of Omaha and Council Bluffs

Standard definitions for United States metropolitan areas were created in 1949; the first census which had metropolitan area data was the 1950 census. At that time, the Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area comprised three counties: Douglas and Sarpy in Nebraska, and Pottawattamie in Iowa. No additional counties were added to the metropolitan area until 1983, when Washington County, Nebraska was added. Cass County, Nebraska was added in 1993; Saunders County in Nebraska and Harrison and Mills counties in Iowa became part of the Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area in 2003.

The 2003 revision to metropolitan area definitions was accompanied by the creation of micropolitan areas and Combined Statistical Areas. Fremont, in Dodge County, Nebraska, was designated a micropolitan area. The Omaha–Council Bluffs–Fremont combined statistical area has a population of 858,720 (2006 estimate).[5]

Components of the Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area

Counties

Nebraska

Iowa

Cities

Primary city

The Downtown Omaha skyline from North Downtown.
  • Omaha – 408,958 inhabitants (2010)

Cities of 10,000 people or more

Cities of 5,000 to 10,000 people

Cities of 1,000 to 5,000 people

Cities and villages with fewer than 1,000 people

Census-designated places

Population information

Omaha–Council Bluffs metro in order of population
County Population
Douglas County, Nebraska 517,310[6]
Sarpy County, Nebraska 158,840[6]
Pottawattamie County, Iowa 90,218[7]
Cass County, Nebraska 25,241[6]
Saunders County, Nebraska 20,780[6]
Washington County, Nebraska 20,234[6]
Harrison County, Iowa 15,745[8]
Mills County, Iowa 15,595[9]

Annexations of formerly incorporated places by the City of Omaha

Annexations by the City of Omaha
Year Former incorporated area name
1854 East Omaha
1877 Kountze Place
1877 Gifford Park
1877 Saratoga
1877 Near North Side
1887 Sheelytown
1887 Bemis Park
1915 South Omaha
1915 Dundee
1917 Benson
1917 Florence
1971 Millard
2005 Elkhorn

Notes

  1. ^ Henry J. Cordes. "For the Omaha metro area, population milestone of 1 million is in sight". Retrieved March 26, 2014. 
  2. ^ Hunzeker, S. "Nebraska Metro & Micro Statistical Areas", Nebraska Department of Labor. Retrieved September 5, 2008.
  3. ^ "May 2007 OES Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Area Definitions." Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved September 5, 2008.
  4. ^ "Metro population hits 865,350". Omaha.com. Retrieved 2011-03-06. 
  5. ^ Iowa Data Center. "Population Estimates and Components of Population Change for Iowa's Combined Statistical Areas (2003 Definition): 2000–2006" (PDF). Retrieved April 6, 2007. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "Metro population hits 865,350". Omaha.com. March 1, 2011. Retrieved October 29, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Pottawattamie County Quick Facts", US Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2008.
  8. ^ "Harrison County Quick Facts", US Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2008.
  9. ^ "Mills County Quick Facts", US Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2008.

External links

  • Population for Iowa metropolitan areas and components, 1950 – 2000
  • omaha.towncommons.com – wiki website for the Omaha–Council Bluffs metro area

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