World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Naemorhedus

Article Id: WHEBN0017027920
Reproduction Date:

Title: Naemorhedus  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Goral (disambiguation), List of mammals of India, Himalayan goral, Long-tailed goral, Red goral, Chinese goral
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Naemorhedus

For other uses, see Goral (disambiguation).
Gorals[1]
Chinese goral, Nemorhaedus griseus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Caprinae
Genus: Naemorhedus
Hamilton Smith, 1827
Species

Naemorhedus goral
Naemorhedus caudatus
Naemorhedus baileyi
Naemorhedus griseus

The gorals are four species in the genus Nemorhaedus or Naemorhedus. They are small ungulates with a goat-like or antelope-like appearance.

The original name is based on Latin nemor-haedus, from nemus, nemoris 'grove' and haedus 'little goat', but was misspelt Naemorhedus by Hamilton Smith (1827).[2][3]

Until recently, this genus also contained the serow species (now in genus Capricornis).[1] The name "goral" comes from an eastern Indian word for the Himalayan goral. The four species of gorals are:

Gorals are often found on rocky hillsides at high elevations. Though their territories often coincide with those of the closely related serow, the goral will usually be found on higher, steeper slopes with less vegetation.

Gorals typically weigh 25-40 kg and are 80-130 cm in length, with short, backward-facing horns. Coloration differs between species and individuals, but generally ranges from light gray to dark red-brown, with lighter patches on the chest, throat, and underside, and a dark stripe down the spine. They have woolly undercoats covered by longer, coarser hair, which helps to protect them in the cold areas where they are often found.

Though the groups share many similarities, gorals are stockier than antelopes and have broader, heavier hooves. Female gorals have four functional teats, while female goats and sheep have only two functional teats. Unlike serows, gorals have no working preorbital glands.

References

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.