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List of tallest buildings in Frankfurt

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List of tallest buildings in Frankfurt

Frankfurt skyline with the new Seat of the European Central Bank under construction in September 2013


This list of tallest buildings in Frankfurt ranks skyscrapers and high-rises in the city of Frankfurt, Germany by height. The tallest structure in Frankfurt is the Europaturm, which rises 337 metres (1,106 ft).[1] However, the observation tower is not generally considered a high-rise building as it does not have successive floors that can be occupied. The tallest habitable building in Frankfurt is the Commerzbank Tower, which rises 259 metres (850 ft) and 56 floors.[2] As of October 2011, the structure is the 197th-tallest building in the world, the seventh-tallest building in Europe and the second-tallest building in the European Union. The second-tallest building in the city is the Messeturm, which rises 257 metres (843 ft) tall and has 55 floors.[3] The 10 tallest buildings in Germany are located in Frankfurt.

Frankfurt is one of the few European cities with a large cluster of high rise building in its downtown area; in many other European cities, skyscraper construction was not well received in the past due to the historical value of existing buildings. For this reason, Frankfurt is sometimes referred to as "Mainhattan" (a portmanteau of the local Main river and Manhattan), and Chicago am Main.[4][5] Most of Frankfurt's downtown area was destroyed by Allied air bombardment during World War II, and only a small number of the city's landmarks were rebuilt.[6] This left ample room for and little opposition against the construction of modern high-rises in the city. Frankfurt went through a first high-rise building boom in the 1970s; during this time, the city saw the construction of nine buildings over 110 metres (360 ft). From 1984 until 1993, Frankfurt went through another building boom, during which time the city's second-tallest building, Messeturm, and the third-tallest building, Westendstraße 1, were completed. The city has now 14 buildings which rise at least 150 metres (490 ft) in height, more than any other city in Germany. As of October 2011, there are 294 completed high-rises in the city.[7]

Frankfurt entered another building boom in 1997, and has seen the completion of 11 buildings over 100 metres (330 ft), e.g. the city's tallest building, Commerzbank Tower, as well as Main Tower, Opernturm and Tower 185. There are several proposal and approved plans for new skyscrapers, including Millennium Tower, 369 metres (1,211 ft), MAX, 228 metres (748 ft), Tower 1, 212 metres (696 ft), Marieninsel, 210 metres (690 ft) and Bahn Tower, 200 metres (660 ft).

As of October 2011, there are 72 high-rise buildings under construction, approved for construction and proposed for construction in Frankfurt.[8]

Frankfurt skyline in June 2013, view from south-west
Diagramm aller Hochhäuser in Frankfurt ab 100 Meter.(fertiggestellt, in Bau, in Planung)

Tallest completed buildings

This lists ranks the tallest buildings in Frankfurt that stand at least 329 feet (100 m) tall. Only habitable building are ranked which excludes radio masts and towers, observation towers, steeples, chimneys and other tall architectural structures. These buildings are included for comparison.

Rank Name Image Height (m)
Height (ft)
Floors Location Year built Notes
Europaturm 337.5 1,107.3 Ginnheimer Stadtweg 90, Bockenheim 1979 Television tower. Second-tallest structure in Germany after the Fernsehturm Berlin. Nickname is Ginnheimer Spargel (Ginnheim Asparagus).
1 Commerzbank Tower 259.0 849.7 56 Große Gallusstraße 17–19, Innenstadt 1997 Tallest building in Europe from 1997 to 2003. Tallest building in the European Union from 1997 to 2011. Tallest building in Germany since 1997. Tallest building completed in the 1990s.[2][9] Height including the antenna is 300 metres. Headquarters of Commerzbank.
2 Messeturm 256.5 841.5 63 Friedrich-Ebert-Anlage 49, Westend-Süd 1990 Tallest building in Europe from 1990 to 1997.[3][10] Main tenants are Goldman Sachs and Thomson Reuters.
3 Westendstraße 1 208.0 682.4 53 Westendstraße 1, Westend-Süd 1993 Headquarters of DZ Bank.[11][12]
4 Main Tower 200.0 656.2 55 Neue Mainzer Straße 52–58, Innenstadt 1999 Height including the antenna is 240 metres. Main tenants are Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen and Standard & Poor's.[13][14]
5 Tower 185 200.0 656.2 55 Friedrich-Ebert-Anlage 35–37, Gallus 2011 Main tenant is PricewaterhouseCoopers.
6 Trianon 186.0 610.2 45 Mainzer Landstraße 16–24, Westend-Süd 1993 Main tenant is DekaBank.[15][16]
7 Seat of the European Central Bank 185.0 607.0 45 Sonnemannstraße/Rückertstraße, Ostend 2014 New seat of the European Central Bank. Height including the antenna is 201 metres.[17]
8 Opernturm 170.0 557.7 42 Bockenheimer Landstraße 2–4, Westend-Süd 2009 Main tenant is UBS.
8 Taunusturm 170.0 557.7 40 Taunustor 1-3, Innenstadt 2014 The project developer is real estate building and operating company Tishman Speyer.
10 Silberturm 166.3 545.6 32 Jürgen-Ponto-Platz 1, Bahnhofsviertel 1978 Tallest building in Germany from 1978 to 1991.[18][19] Former headquarters of Dresdner Bank which merged with Commerzbank in 2009. Main tenant is now Deutsche Bahn.
11 Westend Gate 159.3 522.6 47 Hamburger Allee 2–4, Westend-Süd 1976 Tallest building in Germany from 1976 to 1978. Main tenant is Marriott Frankfurt Hotel.[20][21]
12 Deutsche Bank I 155.0 508.5 40 Taunusanlage 12, Westend-Süd 1984 Tallest twin towers in Frankfurt, also tallest building completed in the 1980s.[22][23] Headquarters of Deutsche Bank. Their nicknames are Soll und Haben (Asset and Liability).
12 Deutsche Bank II 155.0 508.5 38 Taunusanlage 12, Westend-Süd 1984 Tallest twin towers in Frankfurt, also tallest building completed in the 1980s.[23][24] Headquarters of Deutsche Bank. Their nicknames are Soll und Haben (Asset and Liability).
14 Skyper 153.8 504.6 38 Taunusanlage 1, Bahnhofsviertel 2004 Main tenant is DekaBank.[25][26]
15 Eurotower 148.0 485.6 39 Willy-Brandt-Platz 2, Innenstadt 1977 Headquarters of the European Central Bank. The ECB is currently building new and larger headquarters (Seat of the European Central Bank).[27][28]
16 Frankfurter Büro Center 142.4 467.2 40 Mainzer Landstraße 46, Westend-Süd 1980 Main tenant is Clifford Chance.[29][30]
17 City-Haus 142.1 466.2 42 Platz der Republik 6, Westend-Süd 1974 Main tenant is DZ Bank.[31][32]
18 Gallileo 136.0 446.2 38 Gallusanlage 7, Bahnhofsviertel 2003 Main tenant is Commerzbank.[33][34]
18 Nextower 136.0 446.2 34 Thurn-und-Taxis-Platz 6, Innenstadt 2010
20 Pollux 130.0 426.5 33 Platz der Einheit 1, Gallus 1997 [35][36]
21 Garden Tower 127.0 416.7 25 Neue Mainzer Straße 46-50, Innenstadt 1976 [37][38]
22 Messe Torhaus 117.0 383.9 30 Ludwig-Erhard-Anlage 1, Bockenheim 1985 [39][40]
23 Japan Center 115.0 377.3 27 Taunustor 2, Innenstadt 1996 [41][42]
23 Park Tower 115.0 377.3 29 Bockenheimer Anlage 46, Westend-Süd 1972 Main tenant is Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer.[43][44]
25 Westhafen Tower 112.3 368.4 31 Westhafenplatz 1, Gutleutviertel 2003 Main tenant is the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA)[45][46]
26 IBC Tower 112.0 367.5 30 Theodor-Heuss-Allee 70, Bockenheim 2003 [47][48]
27 Büro Center Nibelungenplatz 110.0 360.9 27 Nibelungenplatz 3, Nordend-West 1966 [49][50]
27 Eurotheum 110.0 360.9 31 Neue Mainzer Straße 66–68, Innenstadt 1999 [51][52]
29 Neue Mainzer Straße 32-36 108.6 356.3 28 Neue Mainzer Straße 32-36, Innenstadt 1973 Main tenant is the European Central Bank due to lack of space in the bank's headquarters Eurotower.
30 Holiday Inn Frankfurt City-South 100.0 328.1 25 Mailänder Straße 1, Sachsenhausen-Süd 1972

Tallest under construction, announced and proposed

Under construction

Name City Height (m)
Height (ft)
Floors Estimated Completion
Henninger Turm[53] Frankfurt am Main 140.0 459.3 37 2017

Announced

Proposed (Samples)

Name Height (m)
Height (ft)
Floors Location Estimated Completion Notes
Millennium Tower 369.0 1,210.6 97 Güterplatz 3-7, Gallus
MAX 228.0 748.0 64 Große Gallusstraße 10-14, Innenstadt
Bahn Tower 200.0 656.2 Stuttgarter Straße, Gutleutviertel
Hochhauskomplex Neue Mainzer Straße 197.0 646.3 55 Neue Mainzer Straße 57-59, Innenstadt [54]
Metzler Bank/LHB Internationale Handelsbank Tower 175.0 574.1 44 Große Gallusstraße 18, Innenstadt
Tower 1 175.0 574.1 Hemmerichsweg, Gallus
DZ Bank Tower 175.0 574.1 Mainzer Landstraße, Westend-Süd
Residential tower at Skyline Plaza 165.0 541.3 Taunusanlage 11, Bahnhofsviertel
Marieninsel 155.0 508.5 Taunusanlage 11, Bahnhofsviertel
Former Police Department Tower 145.0 475.7 36 Friedrich-Ebert-Anlage, Gallus
Campus Bockenheim Tower I 140.0 459.3 39 Robert-Mayer-Straße, Westend-Süd
Matthäuskirche Tower 130.0 426.5 Friedrich-Ebert Anlage 33, Gallus The tower is planned on a property behind a church, the Matthäuskirche, because the owning church wants to sell the whole site. The church can be partly integrated into the new building. The plans were approved in 2008 by the city.
WinX Tower 110.0 360.9 28 Neue Mainzer Straße/Weisfrauenstraße, Altstadt 2015
Hafenstraße Tower 110.0 360.9 Hafenstraße/Adam-Riese-Straße, Gallus Planned as an addition to the neighbouring Commerzbank Trading Center Tower (93 metres).
Campus Bockenheim Tower II 100.0 328.1 28 Robert-Mayer-Straße, Westend-Süd Three towers are planned as part of the redevelopment of the area around the AfE-Turm when the Goethe University Frankfurt will move to a new campus in 2014.
Europagarten East Tower I 100.0 328.1 Europa-Allee, Gallus
Emser Brücke Tower I 100.0 328.1 Europa-Allee, Gallus

Timeline of tallest buildings

This lists buildings that once held the title of tallest building in Frankfurt.

Years as tallest Name Image Height (m)
Height (ft)
Floors Location Notes
Since 1997 Commerzbank Tower 259.0 849.7 56 Große Gallusstraße 17–19, Innenstadt Tallest building in Europe from 1997 to 2003. Tallest building in the European Union from 1997 to 2011. Tallest building in Germany since 1997. Tallest building completed in the 1990s.[2][55] Height including the antenna is 300 metres. Headquarters of Commerzbank.
1990-1997 Messeturm 256.5 841.5 63 Friedrich-Ebert-Anlage 49, Westend-Süd Tallest building in Europe from 1990 to 1997.[3][56] Main tenants are Goldman Sachs and Thomson Reuters.
1978-1990 Silberturm 166.3 545.6 32 Jürgen-Ponto-Platz 1, Bahnhofsviertel Tallest building in Germany from 1978 to 1990.[18][57] Former headquarters of Dresdner Bank which merged with Commerzbank in 2009. Main tenant is now Deutsche Bahn.
1976-1978 Westend Gate 159.3 522.6 47 Hamburger Allee 2–4, Westend-Süd Tallest building in Germany from 1976 to 1978. Main tenant is Marriott Frankfurt Hotel.[20][58]
1974-1976 City-Haus 142.1 466.2 42 Platz der Republik 6, Westend-Süd Main tenant is DZ Bank.[31][32]
1972-1974 AfE-Turm 116.0 380.6 32 Robert-Mayer-Straße 5-7, Westend-Süd [59][60]Demolished 2014.[61]

See also

Notes

A. ^ Topped out but not completed.

References

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  53. ^ http://www.deutsches-architektur-forum.de/forum/showthread.php?t=413&page=16
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External links

  • Frankfurt Skyscraper Map
  • Diagram of Frankfurt skyscrapers on SkyscraperPage.com
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