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List of Quebec provincial highways

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Title: List of Quebec provincial highways  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Canada Roads, List of roads in Montreal, Quebec Autoroute 740, Numbered highways in Canada, Quebec Autoroute 440 (Quebec City)
Collection: Lists of Roads in Quebec, Pre-1970S Routes in Quebec, Quebec Provincial Highways
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Date:
 

List of Quebec provincial highways

Example of Route shield

This is a list of highways maintained by the government of Quebec.

Contents

  • Autoroutes 1
  • Routes 2
    • Primary highways 2.1
      • 100-series 2.1.1
    • Secondary highways (South) 2.2
      • 200-series 2.2.1
    • Secondary highways (North) 2.3
      • 300-series 2.3.1
  • Other significantly-long roads 3
  • Pre-1970s Routes 4
  • External links 5

Autoroutes

The Autoroute system in Quebec is a network of expressways which operate under the same principle of controlled access as the Interstate Highway System in the United States or the 400-Series Highways in neighbouring Ontario.

Routes

Other significantly-long roads

Pre-1970s Routes

All Routes under 100 were renumbered in the 1970s. Some are now Routes in the 100-range; others became Autoroutes. Autoroutes are numbered under 100 and above 400, and the conflicting range was changed.

  • Route 1, from Montreal to Quebec City, via Sherbrooke, now Route 112, and Route 171.
  • Route 2, Rivière-Beaudette to Dégelis. Originally part of an interprovincial Route 2 that connected Ontario (ON Highway 2) to New Brunswick (NB Route 2), and further to Nova Scotia (Trunk 2).
  • Route 2A, now Route 230.
  • Route 2C, now Route 138 in Quebec City.
  • Route 3 much of south side of the St. Lawrence River between New York State and Levis, now Highway 132.
  • Route 3A, now Route 201
  • Route 4 from New York State to Montreal, the routing of 138 south of St. Lawrence River.
  • Route 5, now Route 143 and Route 116 from Stanstead to Quebec City; originally a continuation of US 5.
  • Route 6, now Route 132 around the Gaspe Peninsula.
  • Route 6A, now Route 197
  • Route 7, now Route 133, Route 104 and Route 112 from Vermont Interstate 89 to Montreal (Victoria Bridge); originally a continuation of US 7.
  • Route 8, now Route 148 from Laval to Gatineau.
  • Route 9, from New York State to Montreal, extending US 9 along present Autoroute 15 right of way, then to Quebec City following Autoroute 20
  • Route 9A, now Routes 221 and 217
  • Route 9B, now Routes 223, 104 and 134; originally a continuation of New York Route 9B
  • Route 9C, now Route 132
  • Route 10, now a section of Route 132 between Rivière-du-Loup and Matane
  • Route 11, now a section of Route 117, and Route 105.
  • Route 11A, now Route 117
  • Route 12, now Routes 233 and 137
  • Route 13, now Route 139, 143, Autoroute 20 and Route 155
  • Route 14, now Route 201
  • Route 15, now Route 138
  • Route 15A, now Route 362
  • Route 15B, now Route 360
  • Route 16, now Routes 170 and 372
  • Route 16A, now Route 170
  • Route 17, now partly Autoroute 40, Route 342, and Autoroute 20 into Montreal. Originally a continuation of Ontario Highway 17.
  • Route 18, now Autoroute 25/ Route 125
  • Route 19, now Route 155
  • Route 19A, now Route 159
  • Route 19B, now Route 153
  • Route 20, now Route 122
  • Route 21, now Route 133
  • Route 22, now Routes 147, 143 and 122
  • Route 23, now Route 173
  • Route 24, now Route 204
  • Route 25, now Route 281
  • Route 25A, now Route 279
  • Route 26, now Route 283
  • Route 27, now Route 253
  • Route 28, now Route 108
  • Route 29, now Route 344
  • Route 30, now Route 329
  • Route 31, now Route 327
  • Route 32 now Routes 116 and 255
  • Route 33, now Route 341
  • Route 34, now Route 161
  • Route 35, now Route 309
  • Route 36, now Routes 205, 209 and 219
  • Route 37 now local roads in Montreal; ran around perimeter of Montreal island
  • Route 38, now local roads in Laval; ran around perimeter of Ile Jesus
  • Route 39, now Route 243
  • Route 40, now Route 104
  • Route 40A, now Route 104
  • Route 41, now Route 158
  • Route 42, now Routes 158, 343 and 347
  • Route 43, now Routes 347 and 131
  • Route 44, now Route 349
  • Route 45, now Route 386 and 111
  • Route 46, now Route 101
  • Route 47, now Route 223
  • Route 48, now Routes 343 and 131
  • Route 49, now Routes 218, 265 and 165
  • Route 50, now Route 141
  • Route 51, now Route 289
  • Route 52, now Route 202
  • Route 53, now Route 277
  • Route 54, now Route 175
  • Route 54A, now Route 169
  • Route 55, now Route 169, circling around Lac Saint-Jean
  • Route 56, now Route 381
  • Route 57, now Route 323
  • Route 58, now Routes 117 and 113.
  • Route 59, now Route 117
  • Route 60, now Route 111
  • Route 61, now Route 109
  • Route 62, now Route 382
  • Route 63, now Route 393
  • Route 64, now Route 397
  • Route 65, now Route 335
  • Route 105A, now Chemin de la Vallée-Missisquoi; continuation of Vermont Route 105A, a spur of Vermont Route 105. There was never a Route 105 under the old system.
  • Route 108, now Route 237; continuation of Vermont Route 108

External links

  • Transports Québec
  • autoroutes.info: "Ancienne numérotation du Québec"


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