Hunt saboteur

Hunt sabotage is the direct action that animal rights or animal welfare activists undertake to interfere with hunting activity.

Anti-hunting campaigners are divided into those who believe in direct intervention and those who watch the hunt to monitor for cruelty and report violations of animal welfare laws. Interventionists may lay false trails or use sound and visual distractions to prevent the hunters from being successful, and enter[1] hunting estates and farms to disarm animal traps.[2]

Non-interventionists use video, photography and witness statements to support prosecution of hunters who commit offenses or to raise awareness of issues they consider show hunting as cruel, ineffective or in a bad light.

In the United Kingdom the interventionists are often (but not always) members of the Hunt Saboteurs Association, while the non-interventionists are often members of the League Against Cruel Sports or, more recently, Protect Our Wild Animals or the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

In Spain, every year organizations such as Equanimal or the platform Matar por matar, non[3] are involved in the sabotage of the Copa Nacional de Caza del Zorro (Spanish: "National Fox Hunt Cup") following the hunters making noise with megaphones to scare foxes and preventing them from being killed.[4][5]

See also

References

External links

  • Hunt Saboteurs Association
  • Hunting and animal rights press stories
  • North West Hunt Saboteurs Association
  • Joe Hartwell, Author and Hunt Saboteur
  • Hunt Watch
  • Saboteadores de la caza - Equanimal (in Spanish)


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