World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Heliodorus of Emesa

Article Id: WHEBN0000501147
Reproduction Date:

Title: Heliodorus of Emesa  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Novel, Daphnis and Chloe, Chariton, Byzantine literature, Ancient Greek novelists
Collection: 3Rd-Century Writers, Ancient Greek Novelists, Roman-Era Greek Priests, Year of Birth Unknown, Year of Death Unknown
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Heliodorus of Emesa

Heliodorus of Emesa[1] (Greek: Ἡλιόδωρος) was a Greek writer for whom two ranges of dates are suggested, either about the 250s AD or in the aftermath of Julian's rule, that is shortly after 363.[2] Heliodorus of Emesa is known for the ancient Greek novel or romance called the Aethiopica (the Ethiopian Story) or sometimes "Theagenes and Chariclea".

According to his own statement, his father's name was Theodosius and he belonged to a family of priests of the sun. Socrates Scholasticus (5th century AD) identifies the author of Aethiopica with a certain Heliodorus, bishop of Trikka, but the name Heliodorus was a common one. Nicephorus Callistus (14th century) expands this story, relating that the work was written in the early years of this bishop before he became a Christian and that, when forced either to disown it or resign his bishopric, he preferred resignation. Most scholars reject this identification.[3]

Contents

  • See also 1
  • Notes 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

See also

Other ancient Greek novelists:

Notes

  1. ^ From Emesa, Syria.
  2. ^ Robin Lane Fox, Pagans and Christians, 1989, p. 137.
  3. ^ Holzberg, Niklas. The Ancient Novel. 1995. p. 78; Bowersock, Glanwill W. The Aethiopica of Heliodorus and the Historia Augusta. In: Historiae Augustae Colloquia n.s. 2, Colloquium Genevense 1991. p. 43. In Historiae Augustae Colloquium Genevense, 1991; Wright, F.A. Introduction to Aethiopica., n.d.; Glenn Most, "Allegory and narrative in Heliodorus," in Simon Swain, Stephen Harrison, Jas Elsner (eds.), Severan Culture (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2007).

References

  •  

External links

  • (English translation)Aethiopica at Elfinspell
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.