Golden-yellow

"Gold tone" redirects here. For the type of photographic print, see Gold tone (print).
Gold (golden)
Common connotations
First place in a competition, wealth
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FFD700
sRGBB  (rgb) (255, 215, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 16, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (51°, 100%, 100%)
Source X11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)



Gold, also called golden, is one of a variety of yellow-brown color blends used to give the impression of the color of the element gold.

The web color gold is sometimes referred to as golden to distinguish it from the color metallic gold. The use of gold as a color term in traditional usage is more often applied to the color "metallic gold" (shown below).

The first recorded use of golden as a color name in English was in 1300 to refer to the element gold and in 1423 to refer to blond hair.[1]

Metallic gold, such as in paint, is often called goldtone or gold-tone. In model building, the color gold is different from brass. A shiny or metallic silvertone object can be painted with transparent yellow to obtain goldtone, something often done with Christmas decorations.

Metallic gold

Gold (metallic gold)

Metallic Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #D4AF37
sRGBB  (rgb) (212, 175, 55)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 16, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (46°, 74%, 83%)
Source ISCC NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed a representation of the color metallic gold (the color traditionally known as gold) which is a simulation of the color of the actual metallic element gold itself—gold shade.

The source of this color is the ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955), a color dictionary used by stamp collectors to identify the colors of stamps—See color sample of the color Gold (Color Sample Gold (T) #84) displayed on indicated web page:[2]

The first recorded use of gold as a color name in English was in the year 1400.[1]

Web color gold vs. metallic gold

The American Heritage Dictionary defines the color metallic gold as "A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, strong to vivid yellow."

Of course, the visual sensation usually associated with the metal gold is its metallic shine. This cannot be reproduced by a simple solid color, because the shiny effect is due to the material's reflective brightness varying with the surface's angle to the light source.

This is why, in art, a metallic paint that glitters in an approximation of real gold would be used; a solid color like that of the cell displayed in the box to the right does not aesthetically "read" as gold. Especially in sacral art in Christian churches, real gold (as gold leaf) was used for rendering gold in paintings, e.g. for the halo of saints. Gold can also be woven into sheets of silk to give an East Asian traditional look.

More recent art styles, e.g. art nouveau, also made use of a metallic, shining gold; however, the metallic finish of such paints was added using fine aluminum powder and pigment rather than actual gold.

Variations of gold

Pale gold

Gold (Crayola)
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #E6BE8A
sRGBB  (rgb) (230, 190, 138)
HSV       (h, s, v) (34°, 40%, 90%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color pale gold is displayed at right.

This has been the color called gold in Crayola crayons since 1958.

Golden yellow

"Gold-yellow" redirects here. For the food coloring, see gold yellow.
"Yellow-gold" redirects here. For the precious metal, see yellow gold.
Golden Yellow
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FFDF00
sRGBB  (rgb) (255, 223, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 12, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (52.5°, 100%, 100%)
Source [1]/Maerz and Paul
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Golden yellow is the color halfway between amber and yellow on the RGB color wheel. It is a color that is 87.5% yellow and 12.5% red.

The first recorded use of golden yellow as a color name in English was in the year 1597.[3]

Sunglow

Sunglow
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FFCC33
sRGBB  (rgb) (255, 204, 51)
HSV       (h, s, v) (50°, 99%, 98%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color sunglow is displayed at right.

This is a Crayola crayon color formulated in 1990.

Golden poppy

Golden Poppy
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FCC200
sRGBB  (rgb) (252, 194, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 3, 100, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (47°, 98%, 97%)
Source [2]/Maerz and Paul
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Golden poppy is a tone of gold that is the color of the California poppy—the official state flower of California—the Golden State.

The first recorded use of golden poppy as a color name in English was in 1927.[4]


MU Gold

MU Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #F1B82D
sRGBB  (rgb) (241, 184, 45)
HSV       (h, s, v) (43°, 81%, 95%)
Source [3]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

MU Gold is used by the University of Missouri as the official school color along with black. Mizzou Identity Standards designated the color for web development as well as logos and images that developers are asked to follow in the University's Guidelines for using official Mizzou logos.[5]

Harvest gold

Harvest Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #DA9100
sRGBB  (rgb) (218, 145, 0)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 34, 100, 15)
HSV       (h, s, v) (40°, 100%, 86[6]%)
Source Crayola/Maerz and Paul[7]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color harvest gold is displayed at right.

This color was originally called harvest in the 1920s.

The first recorded use of harvest as a color name in English was in 1923.[8]

Harvest gold was a common color for metal surfaces (including automobiles and household appliances), as well as the color avocado, during the whole decade of the 1970s. They were both also popular colors for shag carpets. Both colors (as well as shag carpets) went out of style by the early 1980s

Goldenrod

Main article: Goldenrod (color)
Goldenrod
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #DAA520
sRGBB  (rgb) (218, 165, 32)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 24, 85, 15)
HSV       (h, s, v) (43°, 85%, 85%)
Source X11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the web color goldenrod.

The color goldenrod is a representation of the color of some of the deeper gold colored goldenrod flowers.

The first recorded use of goldenrod as a color name in English was in 1915.[9]

Old gold

Main article: Old Gold
Old Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #CFB53B
sRGBB  (rgb) (207, 181, 59)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 13, 71, 19)
HSV       (h, s, v) (49°, 71%, 81%)
Source
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Old gold is a dark yellow, which varies from heavy olive or olive brown to deep or strong yellow. The widely-accepted color old gold is on the darker rather than the lighter side of this range.

The first recorded use of old gold as a color name in English was in the early 19th century (exact year uncertain).[11] The Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity's colors are Garnet and Old Gold. Old Gold is one of two official colors of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

Maroon and old gold are the colors of Texas State University's intercollegiate sports teams. Old gold and black are the team colors of Purdue University Boilermakers intercollegiate sports teams. The Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets wear white and old gold. The Wake Forest Demon Deacons, UCF Knights, and Vanderbilt Commodores wear old gold and black. The New Orleans Saints list their official team colors as black, old gold and white.

Vegas gold

Vegas Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #C5B358
sRGBB  (rgb) (197, 179, 88)
HSV       (h, s, v) (50°, 55%, 77%)
Source [5]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color Vegas gold.

Vegas gold, rendered within narrow limits, is associated with the glamorous casinos and hotels of the Las Vegas Strip, United States.

Vegas gold is one of the official athletic colors for the Pittsburgh Panthers, the South Florida Bulls, the UAB Blazers, the Pittsburgh Penguins (formerly yellow), and the Vanderbilt Commodores.

Satin sheen gold

Satin Sheen Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #CBA135
sRGBB  (rgb) (203, 161, 53)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 21, 74, 20)
HSV       (h, s, v) (49°, 74%, 76%)
Source
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color satin sheen gold. This is the name of the color of the Starfleet command personnel uniform worn by Captain Kirk of the Starship Enterprise in the TV show and movies Star Trek.[13][14][15]


Cal Poly Pomona gold

Cal Poly Pomona Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #C6930A
sRGBB  (rgb) (198, 147, 10)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 27.5, 100, 8.5)
HSV       (h, s, v) (44°, 94.9%, 77.6%)
Source [7]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Cal Poly Pomona gold is one of the two the official colors of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona). The official university colors are green (PMS 349) and gold (PMS 131). The Cal Poly Pomona Office of Public Affairs created the Cal Poly Pomona colors for web development and has technical guidelines, copyright and privacy protection; as well as logos and images that developers are asked to follow in the University's Guidelines for using official Cal Poly Pomona logos. If web developers are using gold on a university website, they are encouraged to use Cal Poly Pomona gold. It is notable for its prominent use representing Cal Poly Pomona's athletic teams, the Cal Poly Pomona Broncos.

UC Berkeley Gold

UC Berkeley Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #b78727
sRGBB  (rgb) (183, 135, 39)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 26, 79, 29)
HSV       (h, s, v) (40°, 78.7%, 71.8%)
Source UC Berkeley[16]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

This is a shade of gold identified by the University of California, Berkeley in their graphic style guide for use in on-screen representations of the gold color in the university's seal. For print media, the guide recommends to, "[u]se Pantone 874 metallic or Pantone 139 yellow and 540 or 294 blue".[16]

UCLA Gold

UCLA Gold
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FFB300
sRGBB  (rgb) (254, 187, 54)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 29, 91, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (42.1°, 100%, 100%)
Source UCLA[17]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color was approved by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Chancellor in March 2004. This is a shade of gold identified by the university for use in their printed publications.

Golden brown

Golden Brown
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #996515
sRGBB  (rgb) (153, 101, 21)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, , , 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (51°, 37%, 47%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color golden brown.

The first recorded use of golden brown as a color name in English was in the year 1891.[18] Golden brown is commonly referenced in recipes as the desired color of properly baked foods.

Source of color: by Maerz and Paul):

Golden in nature

Protista

Plants

Animals

Golden in human culture

Architecture

Art

Awards

  • The highest award for achievement in many fields is called the Gold medal.

Business

Cosmetology

  • Blonde hair in women (or sometimes men) is sometimes referred to poetically as golden. It is estimated by geneticists that the gene for blonde hair originated about 3000 BC in the area now known as Lithuania among the recently arrived Proto-Indo-European settlers of the area (Lithuania is still the country that has the highest percentage of people with blonde hair); it is thought the gene spread quickly through sexual selection into Scandinavia when that area was settled because men found women with blonde hair attractive.[20][21]

Culture

  • A past era during which the highest quality art was produced or in mythology during which humans were believed to have lived a Utopian lifestyle, is called a golden age.

Drugs

Exploration

Fables

Food

Gemstones

  • South Sea Pearls, which have historically been cultured in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, in the countries of Myanmar, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Northern Australia but mostly attributed to the former thalassocratic Sultanate of Sulu[23] have a gold colored variety from the Pinctada maxima Pearl oyster. This golden pearl is the national gemstone of the Philippines[24] This can now be manufactured in the laboratory at a much lower cost.[25]

Geography

Gerontology

History

Interior design

Law

Legend

Literature

Magic

Marriage

  • The 50th wedding anniversary is called the Golden Anniversary and one is expected to give gifts made of gold to a couple celebrating that anniversary. By extension, the 50th anniversary of any important event is called the golden jubilee.

Military

  • The Gold Star Mothers Club is a club in the United States to provide support for mothers that have lost sons or daughters in military combat.

Music

Mythology

Panelology

Parapsychology

Philosophy

Politics

Professions

  • A person who attains notoriety at a young age in a their chosen profession is called a golden boy or a golden girl.

Religion

Role playing games

Sorority colors

Sororities which use gold as an official color include:

Sports

State decorations

Surnames

  • Gold (or names containing the word Gold) is a common surname among people of Jewish ancestry of European ancestry (Ashkenazi Jews).

Vexillology

See also

  • Or
  • List of colors

References


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