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Germany at the Winter Olympics

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Title: Germany at the Winter Olympics  
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Germany at the Winter Olympics

Germany at the Olympic Games

Flag of Germany
IOC code  GER
NOC German Olympic Sports Confederation
Website www.dosb.de (German) (English) (French)
Olympic history
Summer Games
Winter Games
Intercalated Games
1906
Other related appearances
Unified Team of Germany (1956–1964)
West Germany (1968–1988)
East Germany (1968–1988)
Saar (1952)

Athletes from Germany (GER) have appeared in only 18 of the 20 editions of the Winter Olympic Games as they were not invited to two events after the World Wars, in 1924 and 1948. Germany hosted the 1936 Winter Olympics in Garmisch-Partenkirchen and had been selected to host in 1940 again.

The nation appeared 8 times as a single country (IOC code GER), before World War II and again after German reunification in 1990. Three times, from 1956 to 1964, German athletes from the separate states in West and East competed as a United Team of Germany, which is currently listed by the IOC as EUA, not GER.

Due to partition under occupation that resulted in three post-war German states, German athletes took part seven times for the contemporary states they lived in, in 1952, and from 1968 to 1988. The all-time results of German athletes are thus divided among the designations GER, EUA, FRG, GDR and also SAA (the Saarland only took part in the 1952 Summer games and won no medal).

Including the Winter Games of 2010, German athletes have won 360 medals : 129 gold, 130 silver and 101 bronze. The IOC currently splits these results among four codes, even though only the East German Democratic Republic (GDR) from 1968 to 1988 had sent a separate team to compete against the team of the German NOC that represented Germany (GER) since 1896.

Contents

  • Timeline of Germany at the Winter Olympics 1
    • 1924 - 1948 1.1
    • Separate German teams 1952 - 1988 1.2
  • Medal tables 2
    • Medals by Winter Games 2.1
    • Medals by sport (as GER) 2.2
    • Medals by sport (GDR) 2.3
    • Medals by sport (as FRG) 2.4
    • Medals by sport (as EUA) 2.5
  • References 3

Timeline of Germany at the Winter Olympics

1924 - 1948

1928-1932

In the Paris Peace Conference, the outbreak of World War I was blamed on Germany and other Central Powers allies. These nations, even though having new republican governments by now, were not invited to the 1920 Summer Olympics. While all other banned nations except Germany were invited again for the 1924 Summer Olympics, held for the second time in Pierre de Coubertin's home town of Paris, and for the 1924 Winter Olympics, also held in France, the ban on Germany was not lifted until 1925. This was likely related to the ongoing French Occupation of the Ruhr and the Rheinland between 1923 and 1925. Thus Germany was not present in Chamonix for the first Winter Olympics.

Germany took part the first time in the 1928 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, with rather modest results, scoring only a Bronze medal in bobsleigh. Germany doubled the low score in the 1932 Winter Olympics held in Lake Placid, United States. Both 1932 games, held during the worldwide Great Depression, suffered from low European participation due to high cost of travel overseas.

1936

Already in spring of 1931 it had been decided that the 1936 Summer Olympics were to be held in Berlin. Germany should host the 1936 Winter Olympics, too. From 1933 onwards, Germany became known as Nazi Germany, the change being marked also by the use of the Nazi party flag. To host the winter event, two Bavarian towns were merged to form Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Alpine skiing made its first appearance as the combined, which added the results of both the downhill and slalom which were no separate contests yet. German athletes won Gold and Silver in both the men's and women's combined, for a 2nd rank overall.

The 1940 Winter Olympics were to be held in Sapporo, but Japan withdrew in 1938 due to the Second Sino-Japanese War. In June 1939, Garmisch-Partenkirchen was selected again, but three months later World War II broke out and the 1940 Winter Games were cancelled in November 1939. The 1944 Winter Olympics did not take place either. For the 1948 Winter Olympics, with the war in recent memory, Germany (and Japan) was not invited as it had no recognized NOC anymore. The NOC had been, as other organizations, been dissolved by the Allies.

Separate German teams 1952 - 1988

1952-1956
since 1972

The 1952 Winter Olympics were held in Norway, which had been occupied in 1940 by Germans. Public discussions in Norway were rather lively on the subject of whether or not Germans should be admitted to the Winter Games. Following the annual meeting of the IOC in Vienna in May 1951, invitations were extended to the German Olympic Committee, placed in the Federal Republic of Germany. On the whole, the press approved of this decision, and the reaction of the Norwegian public seemed to prove that the decision was based on a correct estimate of the public opinion.[1]

The IOC had not recognized the East German NOC, and asked the GDR to send athletes to the German NOC team, which was rejected by the GDR officials. The Saarland, having a recognized NOC but barely any winter sports tradition, did not participate in the Winter Games, but in the 1952 Summer Games, before joining West Germany later on. Thus Germans from West Germany took part in the 1952 Winter Olympics in 21 of 22 events, winning two Gold medals in bobsleigh, and one in figure skating. The IOC presently[2] attributes the 2 Gold medals won by Bavarian bobsledder Andreas Ostler to "Federal Republic of Germany (1950-1990, "GER" since) FRG" for a 5th rank, while all other medals are attributed to "Germany GER" for a sixth rank. The figure skating couple Ria Falk/Paul Falk won Gold. Skier Annemarie Buchner aka Mirl Buchner won a medal in each of the three events she took part. Skier Rosa Reichert took another silver medal.

1960-1968

During the Oslo IOC meetings, several important matters were discussed, such as East German participation in Olympic Games. In Olympic Games in 1956, 1960 and 1964, German athletes of both states competed together as United Team of Germany (GER then, currently designated EUA). The 1968 games saw two separate German teams which still used the compromise common symbols.

1972-1988

The two states sent independent teams, incl. separate national symbols, designated as East Germany (GDR) and West Germany (GER 1968-1976, FRG 1980-1988) after that for five Games between 1972 and 1988 until the separate East German state ceased to exist in 1990.

Medal tables

Medals by Winter Games

Games Gold Silver Bronze Total Rank Team
1924 Chamonix - - - - - not invited
1928 St. Moritz 0 0 1 1 Germany
1932 Lake Placid 0 0 2 2 Germany
1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen 3 3 0 6 2nd Germany
1948 St. Moritz - - - - - not invited
1952 Oslo 3 2 2 7 4th Germany
1956 Cortina 1 0 1 2 9th  Germany (EUA)
1960 Squaw Valley 4 3 1 8 2nd  Germany (EUA)
1964 Innsbruck 3 3 3 9 6th  Germany (EUA)
1968 Grenoble 2 2 3 7 8th West Germany
1 2 2 5 10th East Germany
1972 Sapporo 3 1 1 5 6th West Germany
4 3 7 14 2nd East Germany
1976 Innsbruck 2 5 3 10 5th West Germany
7 5 7 19 2nd East Germany
1980 Lake Placid 0 2 3 5 12th West Germany
9 7 7 23 2nd East Germany
1984 Sarajevo 2 1 1 4 8th West Germany
9 9 6 24 1st East Germany
1988 Calgary 2 4 2 8 8th West Germany
9 10 6 25 2nd East Germany
1992 Albertville 10 10 6 26 1st Germany
1994 Lillehammer 9 7 8 24 3rd Germany
1998 Nagano 12 9 8 29 1st Germany
2002 Salt Lake City 12 16 8 36 2nd Germany
2006 Turin 11 12 6 29 1st Germany
2010 Vancouver 10 13 7 30 2nd Germany
Total (GER) 70 72 48 192
Total (GDR) 39 36 35 110
Total (FRG) 11 15 13 39
Total (EUA) 8 6 5 19
Total 129 130 101 360

These totals include the one gold and one silver medal won by Germany in figure skating at the 1908 Summer Olympics.

Medals by sport (as GER)

     Leading in that sport
Sport Gold Silver Bronze Total
Biathlon 16 18 9 43
Speed skating 12 14 10 36
Luge 11 8 7 26
Alpine skiing 11 6 6 23
Bobsleigh 10 5 6 21
Ski jumping 3 3 1 7
Figure skating 4 3 2 7
Cross-country skiing 2 9 3 14
Nordic combined 1 3 2 6
Snowboarding 1 2 0 3
Skeleton 0 1 1 2
Freestyle skiing 0 1 0 1
Ice hockey 0 0 1 1
Total 71 73 48 192

These totals include the one gold and one silver medal won by Germany in figure skating at the 1908 Summer Olympics.

Medals by sport (GDR)

Sport Gold Silver Bronze Total
Luge 13 8 8 29
Speed skating 8 12 9 29
Bobsleigh 5 5 3 13
Biathlon 3 4 4 11
Figure skating 3 3 4 10
Nordic combined 3 0 4 7
Ski jumping 2 3 2 7
Cross-country skiing 2 1 1 4
Total 39 36 35 110

Medals by sport (as FRG)

Sport Gold Silver Bronze Total
Alpine skiing 3 5 1 9
Speed skating 3 0 0 3
Nordic combined 2 1 0 3
Luge 1 4 5 10
Bobsleigh 1 3 2 6
Biathlon 1 2 2 5
Figure skating 0 0 2 2
Ice hockey 0 0 1 1
Total 11 15 13 39

Medals by sport (as EUA)

Sport Gold Silver Bronze Total
Luge 2 2 1 5
Alpine skiing 2 1 2 5
Figure skating 1 2 0 3
Speed skating 1 1 0 2
Nordic combined 1 0 1 2
Ski jumping 1 0 1 2
Total 8 6 5 19

References

  1. ^ Official Report 1952, p. 138
  2. ^ www.olympic.org
  • "Olympic Medal Winners".  
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