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Four-day week

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Title: Four-day week  
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Four-day week

A four-day week is an arrangement where a workplace or school has its employees or students work or attend school over the course of four days rather than the more customary five. [1] This arrangement can be a part of flexible working hours, and is sometimes used to cut costs.

In 2008, employees of the Utah state government all began working ten-hour days from Monday to Thursday.[2][3] By closing state government offices on Fridays, the state expected to save on operating costs such as electricity, heat, air conditioning, and gasoline for state-owned vehicles.[3] Many local governments have had alternative schedules for many years. [4][5][6]

Public schools in Hawaii closed on 17 Fridays in 2010.[7] Over 100 school districts in rural areas in the United States changed the school week to a four-day week; most also extended each school day by an hour or more.[8][9] The changes were often made in order to save money on transportation, heating, and substitute teachers.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ Rex L. Facer II and Lori L. Wadsworth. 2010. “Four-day Workweeks: Current Research and Practice” Connecticut Law Review 42, (4): 1031-1046.
  2. ^ Rex L. Facer II and Lori L. Wadsworth. 2010. “Four-day Workweeks: Current Research and Practice” Connecticut Law Review 42, (4): 1031-1046.
  3. ^ a b "Utah is going to a 4-day workweek". MSNBC. Associated Press. July 3, 2008. 
  4. ^ Lori L. Wadsworth, Rex L. Facer II, and Chyleen A. Arbon. 2010. “Alternative Work Schedules in Local Government: Qui Bono?” Review of Public Personnel Administration 30, (3): 322-340.
  5. ^ Rex L. Facer II and Lori L. Wadsworth. 2008. “Alternative Work Schedules and Work Family Balance: A Research Note.” Review of Public Personnel Administration 28, (2): 166-177.
  6. ^ Rex L. Facer II, Lori L. Wadsworth, and Chyleen Arbon. 2009. “Cities Leading the Way: The Use of Alternative Work Schedules by Cities. 2009 Municipal Yearbook. ICMA Press: Washington DC, pp. 28-33.
  7. ^ "Schools' New Math: The Four-Day Week". The Wall Street Journal. March 8, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b Toppo, Greg (August 20, 2002). "In rural areas, the four-day school week is growing in popularity". The Christian Science Monitor. Associated Press. 
  9. ^ "Four-Day School Weeks". National Conference of State Legislatures. Retrieved February 3, 2011. 
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