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Fondant

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Fondant

Not to be confused with fondue.

Fondant (UK: /ˈfɒndənt/, US: /ˈfɑndənt/ or /ˈfɑndɑnt/, from the French: /fɔ̃.dɑ̃/) is one of several kinds of icing-like substances used to decorate or sculpt pastries. The word, in French, means "melting", coming from the same root as "foundry" in English.

Types

Poured fondant is a creamy confection used as a filling or coating for cakes, pastries, and candies or sweets. In its simplest form, it is sugar and water cooked to the soft-ball stage, cooled slightly, and stirred or beaten until it is an opaque mass of creamy consistency. Sometimes lemon or vanilla is added to the mixture, mainly for taste. Other flavorings are used as well, as are various colorings. For example, the main filling of a Cadbury Creme Egg is poured fondant.

Rolled fondant, fondant icing, or pettinice, which is not the same material as poured fondant, is commonly used to decorate wedding cakes. Although wedding cakes are traditionally made with marzipan and royal icing, fondant is increasingly common due to nut allergies as it does not require almond meal. It includes gelatin (or agar in vegetarian recipes) and food-grade glycerine, which keeps the sugar pliable and creates a dough-like consistency. It can also be made using powdered sugar and melted marshmallows. Rolled fondant is rolled out like a pie crust and used to cover the cake. Commercial shelf-stable rolled fondant often consists principally of sugar and hydrogenated oil. However, different formulations for commercial shelf-stable fondant are available and include more natural combinations such as sugar, cellulose gum and water.

Sculpting Fondant, is similar to rolled fondant with a stiffer consistency, because of its consistency it is used to sculpt objects,

Chemistry

Poured fondant is formed by supersaturating water with sucrose. More than twice as much sugar will dissolve in water at the boiling point as will at room temperature. After the sucrose is dissolved, the solution is left to cool and the sugar will remain dissolved in the supersaturated solution until nucleation occurs. While the solution is supersaturated, if a seed crystal (undissolved sucrose) falls into the mix, or if the solution is agitated, the dissolved sucrose crystallizes to form large, crunchy crystals (which is how rock candy is made). However, if the solution is allowed to cool and then stirred vigorously, it forms many tiny crystals and results in a smooth texture.

Gallery

References

External links

cs:Fondánový papír

nl:Glazuur (gebak) pt:Glacê

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