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Farmer

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Farmer

Farmer
A farmer in Nicaragua
Occupation
Occupation type
Employment
Activity sectors
Agriculture
Description
Related jobs
Rancher (U.S.), grazier (Australia) or stockman

A farmer[1] (also called an agriculturer) is a person engaged in crops, orchards, vineyards, poultry, or other livestock. A farmer might own the farmed land or might work as a labourer on land owned by others, but in advanced economies, a farmer is usually a farm owner, while employees of the farm are known as farm workers, or farmhands. However, in the not so distant past a farmer was a person who promotes or improves the growth of (a plant, crop, etc.) by labor and attention, land or crops or raises animals (as livestock or fish).

Contents

  • History 1
    • Advancements in technology 1.1
  • Types 2
    • Techniques 2.1
  • Farming organizations 3
  • Income 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

History

Farming has been dated back as far as the Neolithic era. By the Bronze Age, the Sumerians had an agriculture specialized labour force by 5,000-4,000 B.C., and heavily depended on irrigation to grow crops. They relied on three person teams when harvesting in the spring.[2] The Ancient Egypt farmers farmed and relied and irrigated their water from the Nile.[3]

Animal husbandry, the practice of rearing animals specifically for farming purposes, has existed for thousands of years. Dogs were domesticated in East Asia about 15,000 years ago. Goats and sheep were domesticated around 8000 BCE in Asia. Swine or pigs were domesticated by 7000 BCE in the Middle East and China. The earliest evidence of horse domestication dates to around 4000 BCE.[4]

Advancements in technology

A combine harvester on an English farm

In the U.S. of the 1930s, one farmer fed only himself and three other consumers. The same farmer now feeds well over a hundred people. However, some authors consider this estimate as flawed as it does not take into account that farming requires energy and many other resources which have to be provided by additional workers, so that the ratio of people fed to farmers is actually smaller than 100 to 1.[5]

Types

An American dairy farmer

More distinct terms are commonly used to denote farmers who raise specific domesticated animals. For example, those who raise grazing livestock, such as cattle, sheep, goats, and horses, are known as ranchers (U.S.), graziers (Australia & U.K.), or simply stockmen. Sheep, goat, and cattle farmers might also be referred to respectively as shepherds, goatherds, and cowherds. The term dairy farmer is applied to those engaged primarily in milk production, whether from cattle, goats, sheep, or other milk producing animals. A poultry farmer is one who concentrates on raising chickens, turkeys, ducks, or geese, for either meat, egg, or feather production, or commonly, all three. A person who raises a variety of vegetables for market may be called a truck farmer or market gardener. Dirt farmer is an American colloquial term for a practical farmer, or one who farms his own land.[6]

In developed nations, a farmer (as a profession) is usually defined as someone with an ownership interest in crops or livestock, and who provides land or management in their production. Those who provide only labor are most often called farmhands. Alternatively, growers who manage farmland for an absentee landowner, sharing the harvest (or its profits) are known as sharecroppers or sharefarmers. In the context of agribusiness, a farmer is defined broadly, and thus many individuals not necessarily engaged in full-time farming can nonetheless legally qualify under agricultural policy for various subsidies, incentives, and tax deductions.

Techniques

A Nepali farmer

In the context of crop rotation, seed saving, slash and burn, or other techniques to maximize efficiency while meeting the needs of the household or community. Historically, one subsisting in this way may have been known as a peasant.

In local food market.

Farming organizations

Farmers are often members of local, regional, or national farmers' unions or agricultural producers' organizations and can exert significant political influence. The Grange movement in the United States was effective in advancing farmers' agendas, especially against railroad and agribusiness interests early in the 20th century. The FNSEA is very politically active in France, especially pertaining to genetically modified food. Agricultural producers, both small and large, are represented globally by the International Federation of Agricultural Producers (IFAP), representing over 600 million farmers through 120 national farmers' unions in 79 countries.[7]

Income

Farmed products might be sold either to a market, in a farmers' market, or directly from a farm. In a subsistence economy, farm products might to some extent be either consumed by the farmer's family or pooled by the community.

See also

References

Notes
  1. ^ Dyer 2007, p. 1: "The word 'farmer' was originally used to describe a tenant paying a leasehold rent (a farm), often for holding a lord's manorial demesne. The use of the word was eventually extended to mean any tenant or owner of a large holding, though when Gregory King estimated that there were 150,000 farmers in the late seventeenth century he evidently defined them by their tenures, as freeholders were counted separately."
  2. ^ By the sweat of thy brow: Work in the Western world, Melvin Kranzberg, Joseph Gies, Putnam, 1975
  3. ^ Nicholson (2000) p. 514
  4. ^ "Breeds of Livestock - Oklahoma State University". Ansi.okstate.edu. Retrieved 2011-12-10. 
  5. ^ Kirschenmann 2000.
  6. ^ Oxford English Dictionary
  7. ^ About the International Federation of Agricultural Producers
Bibliography
  •  
  • Kirschenmann, Frederick (2000). "How many farmers will we need?".  

External links

  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
  • The dictionary definition of farmer at Wiktionary
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